Les Voiles de St.Tropez 01.10.2017

01.10.2017

Les Voiles – Living the Dream

– Elena secures victory in elapsed time in the Autumn Cup, which is celebrating the Yacht Club de France’s 150th anniversary.
– 120 Modern yachts set to race from tomorrow!
– Ever more beautiful, ever more plentiful… the Wallys!

Amidst the festive inauguration of the race village and the thrilling, arrival of the classic yachts, with the wind, in a feeder race from Cannes, the curtain rises on what promises to be a showstopping 2017 edition of Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez. The 53 Classic yachts competing in the Yacht Club de France’s Autumn Cup made the most of a strong E’ly breeze to power along downwind into the bay, their timeless elegance melting into the throng of latest generation yachts, out training with a view to their first day of racing tomorrow. This evening, the event’s contingent of 300 yachts are now all neatly lined up in the small port in France’s Var region or sitting at anchor in the bay, with their 4,000 international crew members eager to get down to the action.

The Yacht Club de France’s Autumn Cup.
With 53 craft signed up for the Autumn Cup, the fleet paid wonderful homage to the 150th anniversary of the yacht club so cherished by its President, Yves Lagane. In a steady breeze of nearly 20 knots, the pretty classic yachts devoured the 23-mile course with gusto in the downwind conditions. The perfect scenario for the large 41m schooner Elena of London (Herreshoff 2009), it came as no surprise that she was the first across the finish line. Twelve minutes later, it was the 15 M JI Mariska (Fife 1909) who bagged 2nd place in elapsed time from right under the nose of the 55m schooner Germania Nova, which finished just 3 minutes later.

As has been the case for 150 years, the Yacht Club de France’s mission is to contribute to the development of yachting in all its forms, from cruising to racing, and to defend and promote the values of solidarity, courtesy and moral elegance that nourish seafarers everywhere. What better philosophy to kick off Les Voiles…

The Modern yachts hit the racetrack
Over 120 Modern yachts, split into 5 IRC groups, will have the race zone to themselves tomorrow, Monday, to launch their first race of the 2017 version of Les Voiles. The IRC A group, which gathers together no fewer than 21 craft of between 20 and 33 metres, will see some of the fastest monohull yachts in the world battling for supremacy. Our thoughts naturally turn to the American record hunter Rambler, the new Maxi 72 Cannonball and the Reichel Pugh design La Bête. With over 40 entries, the IRC D group boasts the cream of the Mediterranean’s amateur racers aboard some extremely high-performance 10-13m racer-cruisers designed by the likes of J Boats, X Yachts, Bénéteau, Dufour and Archambault… An incredibly hotly-disputed category, it will be the theatre for some of the most riveting action this week. Also worth a mention are the „Spirit of Tradition“ boats Farfalla, Savannah and Vintage. There will be a lot of pressure on the IRC C boats, with some very fine boats (GP42, TP52, Swan, Ker, Farr, IMX, Nivelt prototype) chosen to compete for the Edmond de Rothschild Trophy, including the 2016 champion, the TP 52 Team Vision, which has changed hands and is back under the name of Renata with match-racing supremo Sébastien Col at the helm.

Wallys everywhere
A season’s best line-up with no fewer than 14 Wallys, ranging from 24 to 33 metres, the much awaited and highly spectacular jousting will kick off tomorrow in a dedicated round off Pampelonne vying for the BMW Trophy. By popular demand, the skippers and owners have opted for longer races this year, with courses spanning 20 to 30 miles. The three Wallycentos, Galateia (2015), Magic Carpet 3 (2013) and of course Tango, the latest of these Mark Mills’ steeds, are likely to be leading the way, together with J One (Wally 77) and Open Season (Wally 107).

The French America’s Cup team competing at Les Voiles
On the eve of his 45th birthday, Franck Cammas’ appearance at this year’s Les Voiles is a surprising first for this local lad turned America’s Cup contender, who will be competing on a VOR 70 named Babsy, sistership to his Groupama IV, winner of the Volvo Ocean Race in 2012. Intrigued by the festive aspect of this event and its huge blend of marine cultures and traditions, he’ll be joined in the adventure by a sizeable element of the Cup’s Team France, with navigational support from Lionel Péan and Charlie Dalin. “Les Voiles will be a journey of discovery for me. It’s a world I’m not entirely accustomed to after several years with the America’s Cup, it’s ultra-professional universe and its flying boats, but I appreciate the festive aspect and the atmosphere. I’m here with some very good racers, who will be keen to perform well out on the water. I know this boat well and I love the environment and the Mediterranean landscapes; it’s like going back to my beginnings. I’m going to enjoy making the giant leap from flying boats to the magnificent classic yachts. I’ll be keeping an ear out here for all the latest news from the sailing world right now, the protocol for the next Cup, the Volvo which sets sail soon and the start of the Mini… I’ll also be rediscovering big boats, big winches and big sails… The 14 members of the crew are sure to have their work cut out! The start phases, with so many competitors, are going to be tricky to negotiate so it’ll be full-on, but what’s wonderful here is that you cross tacks with all the different profiles from sailing, with both inshore and offshore backgrounds.”

Inauguration of the Village
With the work now complete on the Race Village, the new, revamped version will be bigger and better than ever before, especially in terms of the terrace in front of the bar. This new configuration has also enabled the return of the Rolex hospitality area and some 22 exhibitors will be offering all manner of choice paraphernalia associated with Les Voiles. The Press Centre can this year be found in the large structure at the end of the street housing this wonderful race village.

 

The golden age of the 15-metre yachts
It was in 1907 that a new international rule, designed to bring some proper standardisation to bear across Europe in terms of rating, saw the light of day. Using the initials JI or Jauge Internationale (International rule), it would offer its golden age of yachting seven glorious years, interrupted only by the First World War. The ‘fifteen metres’ that formed part of this rule, were in reality yachts measuring some 22 metres in length, at the very cutting edge of the racing yacht scene. 20 yachts, the majority of which were gaff cutters, hit the water between 1907 (Ma’oona and Shimla) and 1917 (Neptune). Though the Anglo-Saxon naval architects seem to have the upper hand in this domain, with names as prestigious as Fife, Mylne, Nicholson and Anker, two craft are the work of French architects. Encarnita, commissioned by the Marquis of Cuba from designer Joseph Guedon in 1909, and Anémone II designed by C. Maurice Chevreux and built in Cannes. It was the development of the 12-metre Class after the war that would sound the knell of the 15 metre yachts. There are just four still in operation today, all perfectly restored: Mariska (Fife 1908), Hispania (Fife 1909), Tuiga (Fife 1909) and The Lady Anne (Fife 1912). They’ll all be sailing throughout the week in Les Voiles within the context of the Rolex Trophy.

Partners to Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez
ROLEX
BMW
GROUPE EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD
WALLY
KAPPA
HOTEL BYBLOS
MERCANTOUR EVENTS
LES MARINES DE COGOLIN
L’ESPRIT VILLAGE DE SAINT-TROPEZ
POMMERY
JETFLY
DANONE
SUZUKI MARINE
LORO PIANA
ENATA
MARE NOSTRUM
AIR FRANCE
CHEVALIER TORPEZ (LES VIGNOBLES DE SAINT TROPEZ)
SUN 7 GRAPHIC

PROGRAMME:
MODERN YACHTS
Saturday 30 September – Sunday 1 October: Registration and inspection
Monday 2, Tuesday 3, Wednesday 4, Thursday 5(J. Laurain Day, Challenge Day), Friday 6 and Saturday 7 October: Coastal course, 1st start 11:00am

CLASSIC YACHTS
Sunday 1 and Monday 2 October: Registration and inspection
Sunday 1 October: finish of the Yacht Club de France’s Coupe d’Automne from Cannes
Tuesday 3, Wednesday 4, Thursday 5 (J. Laurain Day, Challenge Day, Club 55 Cup, GYC Centenary Trophy), Friday 6 and Saturday 7 October: Coastal course, 1st start 12:00 noon

Prize-giving for everyone
Sunday 8 October, from 11:00am

Organisation:
Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez, Commodore: André Beaufils
Principal Race Officer: Georges Korhel
On the water organisation: Philippe Martinez
On shore logistics: Emmanuelle Filhastre
Financial management: Delphine Reusse
Registration: Frédérique Fantino
Communication: Chloé de Brouwer
Website: www.lesvoilesdesaint-tropez.fr
Facebook: Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez official
Twitter: @VoilesSTOrg

Press Relations:
Maguelonne Turcat
Tel +33 (0)6 09 95 58 91
Email magturcat@gmail.com

Photos:
Gilles Martin-Raget, www.martin-raget.com

 

vabrehomepage-2017

Transat Jaques Vabre 03.10.2017

03.10.2017

www.transatjacquesvabre.org, introducing a new favourite!

www.transatjacquesvabre.org, introducing a new favourite!
Beautiful, useful and responsive; the three keywords which encapsulate the ambition of the new Transat Jacques Vabre website. Already online and fully operational a month before the start, www.transatjacquesvabre.org is the best place to go to get straight back in the swing of this queen of the two-handed transats. Here is a guided tour around the site with Vincent Esnaud, one of the designers.
Screen-Homepage-2017

The torrents of spray, the flares, the legendary duos in action…these are the images showing on a loop on the homepage that make us dream and plunge us straight back into the legend of the Route du Café. With a month before the start, the new site www.transatjacquesvabre.org is a breath of fresh air for the 2017 edition. Its design prioritises images, but the approach is new. “We tried to push the boundaries and not be bound by the rules of ‘one text-one photo’”, says Esnaud, manager of Addviso, who worked in close collaboration with the race organisation and Désigne, the company in charge of the graphic design of the event. “The presentation of the event, like, for example, the timeline, has been treated like a real ‘web-doc’, mixing multiple media: text, photo, interviews, computer graphics, etc.” Esnaud explains. “From a technical point of view, the site was conceived from the outset to be „responsive”(multi-platform) and therefore autonomous: “it works on a computer, tablet or a mobile phone, which makes the existence of a dedicated app unnecessary.”

Engaging and useful

A month before the start, the emphasis is now on the history and the skippers, the 39 duos who will compete in the four classes. From the opening of the race village, on October 27 at 16:00 local time, the listing of events in the Bassin Paul Vatine in Le Havre will be clearly visible. “As the site is responsive, visitors will be able to know what is going on in the village and to keep up with the highlights of the day,” Esnaud says.

Three languages

During the race, which will start on November 5, it will be easy to follow the progress of the sailors as they head to Salvador de Bahia. Available in three languages ​​- French, English, Brazilian – the content of the site will mix stories, analysis and anecdotes, including the videos and audio sent from the competing boats. “Each piece of content will be geo-localised and visible on the map,” Esnaud says. “There will be a sidebar of social networks, run by Mille & une vague, and rather than having to go checking on Facebook or Twitter, all the posts will be grouped in a Social Hub.”

A site for everyone

Beautiful and dynamic, www.transatjacquesvabre.org is also intuitive and practical. As normal, the press area will be where all photos will be available immediately in HD, along with the daily press releases, e-mail alerts and the newsletter.

Finally, in this new school year, how could not have an educational area for schoolchildren and their teachers? As Gildas Gautier, managing director of the Transat Jacques Vabre, sums up: “this new site leaves no one out. It’s a playful and practical space, well-designed and informative – in short, a superb communication tool, matching the level the event.”

Les Voiles de St.Tropez 30.09.2017

30.09.2017

The festival days are here again

– 19th edition of Les Voiles
– Yacht Club de France’s Autumn Cup; game on for the Classics tomorrow
– French America’s Cup skipper Franck Cammas competing at Les Voiles
– André Beaufils: “Les Voiles is improving year on year”

It’s been a long wait since last year’s edition of Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez, but finally the action will kick off again tomorrow in the South of France for 4,000 international racers and their 300 Classic or Modern yachts. Indeed, the Yacht Club de France’s customary Autumn Cup will give everyone a foretaste of the sumptuous feast of racing to come when several dozen Classics glide into the bay of Saint Tropez from Cannes, midway through the afternoon, powered by what promises to be a bracing and rather chilly northerly wind.

Classic Sunday; Modern Monday
With the arrival of the Classics from Cannes setting the tone tomorrow, Monday will be coloured by the highly eclectic fleet of Modern yachts. The futuristic-looking Wallys, which beautifully combine design and performance, are sure to attract attention once again. In fact, 2017 heralds the 20th anniversary of the Magic Carpet saga, which has long been associated with one of the most solid sporting teams of the series led by its owner Sir Lindsay Owen-Jones, triple champion in elapsed time of the Giraglia Rolex Cup. Wallycento Tango, skippered by Marc Pajot, a top Olympic sailor and world champion, will be putting in her first tacks in anger in this wonderful setting this year. Clearly sport and spectacle will be a common thread among the big IRC boats too, with Canonball, a 72-foot maxi built by Premier Composite Technologies in Dubai according to Botin Partners design, likely to create a stir against the series’ giants and hot shots: My Song, Rambler, La Bete (former Rambler), Varsovie and Wallyno… Among all the series, there will of course be the familiar myriad of racers from all kinds of sailing backgrounds, ranging from the America’s Cup to the speedy Mini 6.50s; the latter boats due to set sail from La Rochelle tomorrow on what will be their 40th anniversary. It will come as no surprise then that on one VOR 70, the former Puma, there will be two French winners of the Volvo Ocean race (ex Whitbread), Lionel Péan and Franck Cammas, for whom this will be the first time they’ve raced together on the same boat…

Racing will also commence on Monday for the Trophée Rolex, which has been played out at Les Voiles since 2006. To follow on from the „Grands Tradition“ category in 2016, this year the trophy will reward the best 15 m JI. The four fabulous boats that make up this series, Tuiga, Hispania, The Lady Anne and Mariska, are all over a hundred years old and perfectly embody the golden age of yachting and their legendary architect, William Fife.

From Tuesday, the traditional yachts will hit the racetrack, with a debut appearance at Les Voiles by Chips, an elegant P Class cutter designed by the America’s Cup genius, Starling Burgess (Ranger, Rainbow) in 1913. She will compete alongside more of Burgess’ jewels: Jour de Fête (Q Class), Olympian (P Class) and Spartan (NY 50).

The Yacht Club de France’s Autumn Cup
The Yacht Club de France is 150 years old, making its Autumn Cup all the more special for its President Yves Lagane. A race linking “Les Régates Royales” in Cannes and Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez, the Cup always kicks off festivities in Saint Tropez in spectacular fashion. With several dozen yachts split into four classes, the fleet appear on the horizon at Tour du Portalet with all their sails aloft, bows pressed, in the bid to be first to complete the 21-mile sprint.
All the competitors aboad the traditional yachts must be at the Race Committee’s disposal at 11:00am off the port of Cannes. A solid 15 to 20 knots of NE’ly breeze is expected, with the prize-giving to be hosted in La Batterie in Saint Tropez at 20:00pm, followed by a cocktail.

This year, Les Voiles takes place entirely in October: Why?
As a rule, Les Voiles takes place over the weekend that bridges September and October. A particularity of the 2017 calendar gives the option of two weekends that fall into these criteria. Hence the traditional feeder race from Cannes to Saint-Tropez hosted by the Yacht Club de France’s autumn cup determines the date, kicking off the festivities at Les Voiles on Sunday 1 October.

Quotes:
André Beaufils, President of the Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez
“We’re not reinventing Les Voiles! Year on year we try to please owners, skippers and racers, both on shore and at sea. Any new features are introduced with a view to being in harmony with the event, which always has beautiful classic and modern yachts to discover, with the site evolving according to the contingencies of the port and our partners. Supported by our loyal partner Rolex, the revamped race village will host 22 exhibitors throughout the week, with a large bar forming the post-racing hub each evening.”

Partners to Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez
ROLEX
BMW
GROUPE EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD
WALLY
KAPPA
HOTEL BYBLOS
MERCANTOUR EVENTS
LES MARINES DE COGOLIN
L’ESPRIT VILLAGE DE SAINT-TROPEZ
POMMERY
JETFLY
DANONE
SUZUKI MARINE
LORO PIANA
ENATA
MARE NOSTRUM
AIR FRANCE
CHEVALIER TORPEZ (LES VIGNOBLES DE SAINT TROPEZ)
SUN 7 GRAPHIC

PROGRAMME:
MODERN YACHTS
Saturday 30 September – Sunday 1 October: Registration and inspection
Monday 2, Tuesday 3, Wednesday 4, Thursday 5(J. Laurain Day, Challenge Day), Friday 6 and Saturday 7 October: Coastal course, 1st start 11:00am

CLASSIC YACHTS
Sunday 1 and Monday 2 October: Registration and inspection
Sunday 1 October: finish of the Yacht Club de France’s Coupe d’Automne from Cannes
Tuesday 3, Wednesday 4, Thursday 5 (J. Laurain Day, Challenge Day, Club 55 Cup, GYC Centenary Trophy), Friday 6 and Saturday 7 October: Coastal course, 1st start 12:00 noon

Prize-giving for everyone
Sunday 8 October, from 11:00am

Organisation:
Société Nautique de Saint-Tropez, Commodore: André Beaufils
Principal Race Officer: Georges Korhel
On the water organisation: Philippe Martinez
On shore logistics: Emmanuelle Filhastre

Financial management: Delphine Reusse
Registration: Frédérique Fantino
Communication: Chloé de Brouwer
Website: www.lesvoilesdesaint-tropez.fr
Facebook: Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez official
Twitter: @VoilesSTOrg

Press Relations:
Maguelonne Turcat
Tel +33 (0)6 09 95 58 91
Email magturcat@gmail.com

Photos:
Gilles Martin-Raget, www.martin-raget.com

boot3009

Regates Royales 30.09.2017

30.09.2017

Regates Royales

After five days of racing with typical the Cote d’Azur early autumn conditions -sunny skies and light winds- the 39th edition of the Régates Royales-Trophée Panerai came to an end in grand style. The 15 Metre Mariska got gold in the Big Boat series with a clear score of five wins out of five races, while the One Tonner Ganbare succeeded in snatching the title to Italy’s Il Moro di Venezia by just one point. “Serial winner” Rowdy added yet another victory to her long list, with Argentina’s Cippino at her heels, the 8 Metre Carron II and Linnet skippered by Torben Grael, particularly at ease in light winds, were crowner winners in the gaff cutters classes. Save the date for September 2018, for the 40th edition.

The 39th edition of the Régates Royales-Trophée Panerai was marked by a sweet sea-breeze, a light south-easterly building in the early afternoon and later,decreasing and dying towards sunset, by close racing at sea and lively social events ashore. This year several new entries debuted in Cannes, to the likes of the two P-Class Olympian and Chips skippered by Marc Audineau and Bruno Troublé respectively, that duelled all week to get gold in the gaff cutters’ class, or Stéphane Richer’s tiny Ellad , a gorgeous Fife-designed canoe-stern from 1937 and the fast Fjord III by Argentinean German Frers Senior; from François Ramoger’s 6 Metre Azaïs designed by François Camatte and totally restored by his grandson, to Italy’s Ardi (ex-Kerkyra II), a 1968 One Tonner by the famous American firm Sparkman & Stephens.

A light south-easterly was on the menu for the last race, crucial to define the podium positions in several classes. First boat to cross the finish line in real time was, Mariska, that showed excellent speed in light air as did Fabien Després’ Viola, Cholita skippered by Italian Bruno Catalan, and Daniel Sielecki’s Cippino from Argentina.

Brazilian star Torben Grael drove NYYC 30 Linnet, owned by Italian Patrizio Bertelli, to the highest step of the podium, with P Class Olympian in second and Viola in third.

In the Classic Racers’ class Don Wood’s One Tonner Ganbare reshuffled the cards on the very last day, snatching victory from the Italian Maxi Il Moro di Venezia skippered by Massimiliano Ferruzzi by just one tiny point. Gold also went to French Jean-Pierre Sauvan’s Maria Giovanna II in the Vintage Marconi class whilst Karl Lion’s Tabasco 5 dominated in the Spirit of Tradition division with four wins.

“We had very good racing for the Dragons, the 5.5 and the Tofinou, despite light wind conditions, thanks to the good work from the Race Committees we could launch at least a race every day. I wish to thank all those who worked so hard this week. And everything went very well for the classics too, with an ideal setup for such gorgeous boats. See you next year in Cannes for the 40th edition!” Declared Jacques Flori, President of Yacht Club de Cannes

“On a sports level everything worked out well, no matter the light wind. Ashore, the social events were also a success, especially the Birthdays’ Night. The media coverage has been good, and the volunteers did a great job. We hope to be able to offer even more opportunities to enjoy fully the Régates Royales-Trophée Panerai for the locals and the tourist next year.” Said Pascal Gard, COO Régates Royales de Cannes

For full results, more photos, videos and interviews please visit: www.regatesroyales.com

 

Serial sailors
German Frers

Is this your first time in Cannes?
“No, I’ve been here before with my boat Sonny, three years ago.”

And this year you are back with Fjord III
“Yes, this is a very special boat for me, it used to belong to my father when I was five years old. It’s the first boat I’ve sailed with and a very good one, a real racer that won the Bermuda Race in 1954. My father was also a yacht designer, he was passionate about sailing, he taught me the fundamentals and he’s the reason why I chose to be in this business. And so it’s my son, since twenty years, carrying on the family tradition. “

You have created a lot of different boats, haven’t you?
“Yes, quite a few. I’ve designed all the old Maxis like Ragamuffin, Il Moro di Venezia and some America’s Cup boats, Il Moro, Luna Rossa…”

What do you think of the new AC protocol and the news that have been announced?
“I’m very happy that it is going to be monohulls, that there will be a nationality rule and the boat will have to be built in the team’s country. We go back to the tradition of the America’s Cup and for me it makes sense. I have a lot of admiration for multihull sailors but I think it’s a different sport.“

Will you be working with Luna Rossa again?
“We worked together since 2000, I don’t know about the future, it’s too early to say.”

How is it going with Fjord III in Cannes?
“We are second in the overall I think, we won yesterday and today’s race so the final results are still to be decided in this last round.”

volvo-2017-045

Volvo Ocean Race 30.09.2017

30 September, 2017
Volvo Ocean Race holds landmark sustainability workshop
Over 100 Volvo Ocean Race sailors, shore crew, stakeholders and industry leaders came together at the Volvo Ocean Race Boatyard in Lisbon to learn more about ocean health and share ideas on how to tackle plastic pollution in 2017-18 (full story below)

The Volvo Ocean Race’s renewed commitment to ocean health for the 2017-18 edition was underlined with a landmark sustainability workshop on Saturday.

The event, held in the Volvo Ocean Race Boatyard facility in Lisbon, saw over 100 sailors, shore crew, stakeholders and industry leaders come together to learn more about plastic pollution, hear more about the Volvo Ocean Race’s sustainability plans for the next edition, and share ideas on how to optimise collective efforts during the race, which begins on 22 October 2017.

Led by 11th Hour Racing, the session featured keynote speakers from around the globe to give the Volvo Ocean Race sailors a new perspective on ocean health ahead of their gruelling race around the planet.

“The Volvo Ocean Race has put sustainability at the heart of everything – and I’m here to demonstrate and support the Race’s commitment to this conversation,” said 11th Hour Racing President, Jeremy Pochman.

“I think that this is the first time an entire sports event organisation has committed to sustainability in this way, and we’re really excited to help facilitate this training.”

He added: “Our commitment is to make all of the Volvo Ocean Race sailors into spokespersons, so to see all the sailors and the shore crews here, talking about how we make this programme come to life is really exciting.”

11th Hour Racing aims create and inspire systemic change amongst the sailing and maritime communities by promoting behaviour and action through strategic partnerships focused around ocean health.

“It’s really nice to bring all the teams together for a subject that we’re all committed to,” said Turn the Tide on Plastic skipper Dee Caffari. “We’re all very passionate about the Race’s sustainability focus and ultimately we have to deliver that message as ocean ambassadors.

“As sailors we get to play in this unique playground and we see the impact that plastic pollution is having on ocean health. For that reason, we’re the best people to pass the message on, and regardless of which team we’re racing with, collaboratively, we can all make a very big impact.”

Ocean health campaigner Emily Penn also spoke about the dangers of micro plastic and gave the sailors tips on how to communicate the message, as well as reduce personal plastic consumption.

Other speakers included 11th Hour Racing’s Jill Savery; Volvo Ocean Race’s Anne-Cécile Turner and Meegan Jones; Dr Toste Tanhua, Senior Scientist in Chemical Oceanography at GEOMAR, and Dr Stefan Raimund, Scientific Consultant at SubCTech.

“We go to some very remote places, and as we race around the world we’re hoping to collect some ground-breaking scientific data for the first time. We’ll be sampling water and collating those results with GPS tracking – and we’ll keep the filters, so we can identify the volume of micro plastics in each section of the ocean,” continued Caffari, whose campaign is backed by the Mirpuri Foundation and Ocean Family Foundation, and will amplify the United Nations ‘Clean Seas’ campaign around the world.

“By the time we finish the race, we should have lots of real data that we can use to push our message further, and take to governments and decision makers globally.”

After the session, the teams took part in a clean up around the Volvo Ocean Race village, organised by Vestas 11th Hour Racing sailor Damian Foxall.

“We want to create a positive plastic footprint,” he said. “We can cut consumption, but also recycle, refuse, educate and pick up. It’s all very well sitting down and learning about sustainability – but it’s not until you get hands on that you actually make the connection.”

The Volvo Ocean Race’s sustainability focus in 2017-18 consists of three key pillars: to maximise impact, minimise footprint, and leave a positive legacy.

“We’re delighted that all seven of our teams and our wider stakeholder network came along to support our renewed sustainability focus in 2017-18,” explained Anne-Cécile Turner, Sustainability Programme Leader at Volvo Ocean Race.

“This session is the first of a series of exciting activations we’ll be holding throughout the race – including education and science programmes, and Ocean Summits in seven Host Cities around the planet in order to continue driving conversation around sustainability, and to influence decision makers and business leaders in local markets.”

rc44day4

RC44 Cascais Cup 02.10.2017

02.10.2017
Day 4 RC44 Cascais Cup – Come from behind win for Katusha in Cascais
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pE4jFSJL9SI&feature=youtu.be – Video
Cascais laid on an action-packed day for the conclusion of the 2017 RC44 Championship’s penultimate event, the RC44 Cascais Cup. At the beginning of it, Igor Lah’s Team CEEREF held a slender lead, but lost it to Charisma. By the start of the third and final race Alexander Novoselov’s Katusha was leading by two points. Despite Team CEEREF sailing an immaculate final race, a second placed finish for Katusha enabled the Russian team to win the RC44 Cascais Cup by just one point.

Katusha’s 3-1-2 scoreline today was the best that any of the boats has posted all week in what has been a fairly high scoring regatta.

With the wind in the 10-12 knot range for the start of today’s first race, by the end of that race it had piped up to 20 and remained in the 20-25 knot range for the remainder of the day. This enabled the RC44s to hit their top speeds, but with considerable drama as the crews clung on to their yachts on downwind sleigh rides.

1 October-RC44 Cascais Cup-Fleet Racing Day 4

Cascais laid on an action-packed day for the conclusion of the 2017 RC44 Championship’s penultimate event, the RC44 Cascais Cup. At the beginning of it, Igor Lah’s Team CEEREF held a slender lead, but lost it to Charisma. By the start of the third and final race Alexander Novoselov’s Katusha was leading by two points. Despite Team CEEREF sailing an immaculate final race, a second placed finish for Katusha enabled the Russian team to win the RC44 Cascais Cup by just one point.

Embed: < iframe width=“560″ height=“315″ src=“https://www.youtube.com/embed/pE4jFSJL9SI“ frameborder=“0″ allowfullscreen>

30 September – RC44 Cascais Cup – Fleet Racing Day 3

Day three of the RC44 Cascais Cup saw three more teams come to the fore for the first time. Conditions were difficult for the race committee, who ran the first race on the ‚offshore course‘ in wind heading for the high 20s, and then had to move the race track into the Tagus estuary. Here the sea state was calmer, but an unusual offshore northerly was causing significant shifts, gusts and holes in the breeze.

Embed: < iframe width=“560″ height=“315″ src=“https://www.youtube.com/embed/HjuXvO8fJSA“ frameborder=“0″ allowfullscreen>

29 September – RC44 Cascais Cup – Fleet Racing Day 2

Again it was a day with three different winners and mixed results for all. Kirill Frolov’s Bronenosec Sailing Team scored the first bullet of the day. Race two was claimed by Alexander Novoselov’s Katusha, so far the only boat in the event to have won two races. There was much excitement in race three as Artemis Racing Youth led around the first mark. The young Swedes fended off a strong challenge from John Bassadone’s Peninsula Petroleum to claim the final race of the day.

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28 September – RC44 Cascais Cup – Fleet Racing Day 1

Competition out on the water for day one of the RC44 Cascais Cup showed that the two points separating the top five boats in the overall 2017 RC44 Championship to be no aberration. After three races the leaderboard is similarly tight with just five points separating the top seven boats. Not only was there three different winners, but in each case the winner was not the leader at the first top mark rounding.

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