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Transat Jacques Vabre 23.11.2017

23.11.2017
Four podiums full and seven boats still racing
After a late night finish that will go down in transat racing legend, the podiums of all four classes in the 13th edition of the Transat Jacque Vabre are complete.
If the Ultime class had seemed like a close finish on Monday, November 13, with less than two hours separating first and second place, the Class40 was balanced on a razor’s edge. Maxime Sorel and Antoine Carpentier on their 40ft monohull, V and B, beat Aymeric Chappellier and Arthur Le Vaillant, on Aïna Enfance and Avenir by just 17 minutes and 42 seconds.

Phil Sharp (Britain) and Pablo Santurde (Spain), on Imerys Clean Energy, who led the race for 12 of the 17 days finished hours later still under the cover darkness in the Bay of All Saints in Salvador de Bahia.

“What an incredible fight we have been through over the last two and a half weeks,” Sharp said. “An intense three-way boat design battle against the Mach 3s Aina Enfance et Avenir and V and B, a battle against different weather extremes, and a battle against our own personal limits.”

The biggest winner of the day though was Sam Manuard, who watched as the first four places in the Class40 were taken by boats he designed.

Sharp and Santurde won the race-within-a-race between the older generation boats, beating Bertrand Delesne and Justine Mettraux (Switzerland), on TeamWork40 into fourth. Imerys Clean Energy was pushed past its supposed maximums but still could keep pace with the latest generation French boats that remorselessly hunted him down and passed him.

“Whilst Phil’s Mach 2 is a great all-rounder, the Mach 3 evolution was designed to achieve different goals,” Manuard, who finished second with Sorel in V and B in 2015 explained. “Clearly the gains are in reaching and they also have a sweet spot in certain downwind conditions. Phil and Pablo have done an amazing job, once again proving what great sailors they are.”

It was a fact that the French skippers were keenly aware of as they passed Imerys Clean Energy in the same wind on Monday, November 20. “We felt for Phil and Pablo (Imerys Clean Energy) because they couldn’t do anything,” Antoine Carpentier, co-skipper of V and B, said. “We spent the day ovetaking them in the trade winds, we went 1.5 knots faster. We didn’t dare to get them on the VHF for fear that it is badly received.” Rivals and comrades – such is the spirit in offshore sailing and the warm hugs on the pontoon between all three teams were testimony to the spirit of this Route du Café.

Read the finish report here

Read the blow-by-blow of the Class40 race here

Lanterne rouge

Meanwhile, back in the Atlantic, seven boats are still trying to reach the line. The most pressure is probably on the lanterne rouge (backmarker) Esprit Scout, which because of a technical pit stop is far behind the rest and may struggle with an active Doldrums, which it will enter tomorrow. It must average 7 knots over the 1,500 miles still to go if it is to cross the finish line before it officially closes on December 2 at 23:19:15 UTC

Arrivals

Wednesday, November 22

Winner

Maxime Sorel and Antoine Carpentier on their 40ft monohull, V and B at 23:19:15 (UTC).

Race time: 17 days 10 hours 44 minutes and 15 seconds

Second place

Aymeric Chappellier and Arthur Le Vaillant, on Aïna Enfance and Avenir at 23:36:57 (UTC).

Race time: 17 days, 11 hours 01 minutes and 57 seconds

Third place

Phil Sharp (Britain) and Pablo Santurde (Spain), on Imerys Clean Energy at 04:33:41 (UTC).

Race time: 17 days, 15 hours 58 minutes and 41 seconds

Fourth place

Bertrand Delesne and Justine Mettraux (Switzerland), on TeamWork40 at 13:22:46 (UTC).

Race time: 18 days, 00 hours 47 minutes and 46 seconds

Fifth place

Oliver Cardin and Cédric Château, on Région Normandie Junior Senior by Evernex at 15:16:56 (UTC)

Race time: 18 days, 02 hours 57 minutes and 41 seconds

ETAs:

Friday, November 24

Colombre XL 05:00 UTC / Le Lion d’Or 14:00

Saturday, November 25

Eärendil 23:00

Sunday, November 26

Gustave Roussy 01:00

Monday, November 27

Mussulo 40 Team Angola 05:00

Les mots des partenaires
Phil Sharp, skipper of Imerys Clean Energy (Class40)

“What an incredible fight we have been through over the last 2.5 weeks. An intense 3-way boat design battle against the Mach 3s Aina Enfance et Avenir and V and B, a battle against different weather extremes, and a battle against our own personal limits. “It has been a great privilege to sail with Pablo. I couldn’t have asked for a more motivated and skilled co-skipper for this race. We had a lot of laughs on board, even in the most extreme of circumstances, and above all he even learnt how to make a damn fine porridge to alleviate my morning cooking duties.” “I’m not going to hide the fact that watching our lead wither away over the last few days has been difficult to swallow. Though it’s not exactly the result we had hoped for, or had worked towards during this race, I am satisfied to say that we really did give it our all. We pushed the boat and ourselves to 100% over the whole race and made the most of opportunities that came our way. Unfortunately, the cushion from the doldrums wasn’t enough to fend off the newer, more powerful Mach 3s in the South Atlantic with the reaching conditions that we faced. Once we finally entered a level playing field off Recife, it was too late to catch up and so with nothing to lose we tried the only alternative, to go offshore, which sadly gave no advantage. In the end this was a game of boat evolution, and the latest design won.”
Maxime Sorel, skipper of V and B (Class40)

„Thanks for the welcome on the line, it was crazy. This victory feels magnificent because there are two outstanding competitors behind us. We left Le Havre together, we arrived in Brazil together, everything came down to the last night. They did an incredible job and so did we. It was nice from the start, we were happy to pass the buoy at Fécamp in the lead. We said ‚There’s one battle won, now it’s the war!‘ But we had lots of moments of despair. “At Brittany point, we had a broken bulkhead; we called Sam Manuard the designer (of the boat) who advised us on how to fix it. We thought that if we wanted it to hold, we had to wait. We waited three hours seeing our competitors pass. It was hard, we sat down, we had a coffee on the advice of Sylvie Viant (race director). When we left, we had 50 miles to make up. But in the end, it may have helped us because we didn’t push the boat to the limit.“

Antoine Carpentier, co-skipper, V and B (Class40)

„It’s a competitive class. It was what people were saying before we left; half the fleet (of 15) could have won the race. In the end, the new generation boats go much faster reaching. We felt for Phil and Pablo (Imerys Clean Energy) because they couldn’t do anything. We spent the day ovetaking them in the trade winds, we went 1.5 knots faster. We didn’t dare to get them on the VHF for fear that it is badly received. Phil and Pablo raced like crazy. They found a lot of pace. But we knew it was good to come out of the Doldrums with them. Even in the south east trade winds after that, they held a moment.“
Pablo Santurde, co-skipper of Imerys Clean Energy (Class40)

“I’m really happy with the fact that we never gave up and we fought to the maximum. It has been a fantastic race – I had everything I could have asked for: competition, perfect sailing conditions and great company. Losing our advantage has been tough and has been difficult to go through, but I guess in a few days we will give more value to this 3rd place. It’s a complete contrast to my last TJV when four years ago we were forced to stop at the beginning of the race and we ended up catching up over a long distance. As always it has been a great opportunity to share this race with Phil, with lots of lessons learned from him and great memories together.”

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Transat Jacques Vabre 23.11.2017

23.11.2017
Transat Jacques Vabre:

A totally successful outcome for the IMOCAs

With Romain Attanasio and Aurélien Ducroz finishing on Wednesday 22nd November, the thirteenth Transat Jacques Vabre came to an end for the IMOCAs. This year’s race was won by Jean-Pierre Dick and Yann Eliès on StMichel-Virbac. There was a very positive outcome for the IMOCA class, as all thirteen boats that lined up for the start in Le Havre made it to the finish in Salvador da Bahia. While the boats were shown to be reliable, the high standard of racing also stood out. This is all very promising for the next events on the IMOCA calendar…

Thirteen boats out of thirteen at the finish: an exceptional result
The 2016-2017 Vendée Globe gave us the lowest retirement rate in the history of the event with 18 skippers out of 29 making it to the finish. The 2017 Transat Jacques Vabre has done even better with a 100% success rate. A very pleasing outcome for Antoine Mermod, President of the IMOCA class: “It is exceptional to see all the boats at the finish in a major ocean race with such a line-up. This result is all the more pleasing, as it was a very demanding race where everyone pushed hard. This success rate is down to the quality of the skippers and the preparation of their boats. In a post-Vendée Globe year, the boats have been tried and tested and have shown what they can do around the world. They were also well taken care of afterwards by the teams. We’re not in a development phase with the risk of breakage that that entails. Having said that, a lot of boats changed hands after the Vendée Globe and we might have feared that some weren’t ready for their first major race, but that wasn’t the case. By completing the race, the newcomers showed they were able to live up to their ambitions.”This 100% success rate is excellent news for the sailors, who are looking for funding in order to take part in the next big races on the IMOCA calendar, starting with the 2018 Route du Rhum. “This proves we have a reliable fleet and that is something that can be highlighted when in discussions with potential partners,” stressed Antoine Mermod.A high standard of racing and a top quality competition
It should be pointed out that the three skippers on the Transat Jacques Vabre podium have been sailing on their boats now for several seasons and they made the most of this knowledge. Jean-Pierre Dick (StMichel-Virbac), Paul Meilhat (SMA) and Morgan Lagravière (Des Voiles Et Vous!, the former Safran) all managed to find excellent sailors to accompany them, with respectively Yann Eliès, Gwénolé Gahinet and Eric Péron. “These three crews had that little bit extra in their ability to sail the boat and choose the best routes,” explained Antoine Mermod. “But those crews just discovering their boats as they made their way across the Atlantic weren’t that far behind. They have made a lot of progress in getting to grips with their IMOCA and have already shown that they are to be reckoned with. Boris Herrmann and Thomas Ruyant (4th on Malizia II – editor’s note) did a really good job, as did Louis Burton and Servane Escoffier (Bureau Vallée 2), who were in fourth place before the Doldrums, where they had some bad luck. As for Kito de Pavant and Yannick Bestaven, they had a magnificent race on a fine-tuned boat from 2006 that they pushed 120% of the way throughout the crossing. Overall, everyone did a good job and the overall standard was exceptionally high.”

We should add that there were three women in the 2017 Transat Jacques Vabre (Servane Escoffier, Sam Davies, Isabelle Joschke) and they all worked well. Two of them intend to take part in the races leading up to the 2020 Vendée Globe. While Sam Davies is already backed by a solid partner (Initiatives Cœur), Isabelle Joschke is looking for new sponsors, after gaining a lot of experience in the 2017 season, where she performed consistently well. “Isabelle has huge potential. We’re keeping our fingers crossed that she will be able to complete her budget and continue her career in the IMOCA class,” declared Antoine Mermod.“A lot of positive energy”

The other good news for the IMOCA class is that the relationship with the skippers, teams and organisers is very good. Antoine Mermod: “Everyone enjoyed themselves during the race, but also in everything to do with the race. We end the enriching 2017 season with a lot of changes and we are getting ready to enter a new cycle leading up to the 2020 Vendée Globe. We can feel a lot of positive energy.”

The 2017 Transat Jacques Vabre rankings for the IMOCAs
1. Jean-Pierre Dick & Yann Eliès (StMichel-Virbac)
2. Paul Meilhat & Gwénolé Gahinet (SMA)
3. Morgan Lagravière & Eric Péron (Des Voiles Et Vous !)
4. Boris Herrmann & Thomas Ruyant (Malizia II)
5. Kito de Pavant & Yannick Bestaven (Bastide Otio)
6. Tanguy De Lamotte & Samantha Davies (Initiatives Cœur)
7. Louis Burton & Servane Escoffier (Bureau Vallée 2)
8. Isabelle Joschke & Pierre Brasseur (Generali)
9. Alan Roura & Frédéric Denis (La Fabrique)
10. Yohann Richomme & Pierre Lacaze (Vivo A Beira)
11. Arnaud Boissières & Manuel Cousin (La Mie Câline-Artipôle)
12. Fabrice Amedeo & Giancarlo Pedote (Newrest-Brioche Pasquier)
13. Romain Attanasio & Aurélien Ducroz (Famille Mary-Etamine Du Lys)

A few facts and figures about the IMOCAs in the Transat Jacques Vabre:
– 13 days, 7 hours, 36 minutes and 46 seconds: the race time for the winners, Jean-Pierre Dick and Yann Eliès
– 4: the number of wins achieved by Jean-Pierre Dick in the Transat Jacques Vabre on an IMOCA
– 13.63 knots: The average speed set by Dick and Eliès on the Great Circle Route (direct route)

– 3 days, 20 hours, 5 minutes, 41 seconds: the gap between the winner, StMichel-Virbac and the final boat home, Famille Mary-Etamine Du Lys
– 0: the number of boats that retired

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Transat Jacques Vabre 23.11.2017

23.11.2017
Imerys Clean Energy finishes third in Transat Jacques Vabre Class40
Phil Sharp (Britain) and Pablo Santurde (Spain), on Imerys Clean Energy, have finished third in the Class40 of the 13th edition of the Transat Jacques Vabre after crossing the finish line in the Bay of All Saints in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil on Thursday, November 23, 2017 at 04:33:41 (UTC) 17 days, 15 hours 58 minutes and 41 seconds after leaving Le Havre, Normandy, France.
Imerys Clean Energy covered the theoretical course of 4,350 nautical miles at an average speed of 10.27 knots but actually sailed 4,539 nautical miles at an average speed of 10.70 knots. It finished 05 hours, 14 minutes and 26 seconds behind the winner, V and B (Maxime Sorel and Antoine Carpentier), which had been chased all the way to the line by Aïna Enfance et Avenir (Aymeric Chappellier and Arthur Le Vaillant).

“It’s a great relief to arrive in Salvador de Bahia and have a caipirinha and some fruit,” Sharp said after stepping onto the pontoons in Salvador de Bahia. “This transat was really extreme with V and B and Aïna Enfance et Avenir. It was a great battle with my competitors but also with the many different types of weather and against our limit of physical and mental fatigue. There was no moment where you could relax.

“This isn’t the result we dreamed about, but we’re happy to have done the best we could have with our boat. We pushed it to 100% and our strategy was good. The end of the race was tough, but it’s really a matter of boat design and it wasn’t possible to keep up with the more recent designs.

“We led the whole first week, we lost in the Doldrums by entering to the west but we got out a little earlier. We wanted an advantage when we got out but it wasn’t enough. We did a good job and pushed the boat to the limits. And for that, we have to celebrate this finish.”

Sharp and Santurde led across the start line in Le Havre and after passing the brutal cold front off the Bay of Biscay they led the race for nearly 13 days (bar a few hours in the Doldrums) from November 7 until the morning of November 20 when Aïna Enfance et Avenir sailed passed them. Five hours later, V and B pushed them into this third.

It was a case of technology not strategy at that point. Imerys Clean Energy were ahead by 20 miles coming out of the Doldrums on Saturday, November 18, as their westerly positioning paid out. But it was not enough.

The three boats on the podium are all Manuard design, but the two French 40ft monohulls are the version 3 of the Mach 40 design and Sharp’s version 2 is simply slower in the reaching wind angles they have had since the Doldrums. Aïna Enfance et Avenir was launched this year and Sam Manuard the designer had further optimised V and B, after sailing it to second with the winning skipper here, Maxime Sorel, in 2015.

Imerys Clean Energy was originally the boat that won the 2013 Transat Jacques Vabre and Sharp has restored it after it fell into serious disrepair, but the technology has moved on. It may only be a half a knot difference, but over 24 hours that is heartbreaking – or like being in a slowly closing vice.

The 36-year-old, Sharp, an Imperial College mechanical engineering graduate from Jersey, is no stranger to battling powerful French fleets. He made his mark by winning the Class40 of the prestigious single-handed Route du Rhum in 2006 at his first attempt.

In 2013, Santurde, the 30-year-old Spanish sailor, finished second in the Class40, in a duo with Alex Pella (a winner in the Multi50 trimaran class in this edition).

“It’s different from my previous Transat Jacques Vabre,” Santurde said, “because we stopped very early for damage and we had to catch up for whole of the race. Here, we led the whole first week with Phil who was always pushing the boat to 110%. Finally we lost the race at the end, but I’m very happy to be here.”

Imerys Clean Energy’s time also puts them almost five days inside the old record that fell last night of 22 days 13 hours 2 minutes 22 seconds set by the Italian duo Giovanni Soldini and Pietro D’Ali on Telecom Italia in 2007 (the first time Class40 had been included in the Transat Jacques Vabre and the last time the race went to Salvador).

Read a replay of the whole Class40 race here

Video interviews can be found here (register if required)

Transat Jacques Vabre 23.11.2017

23.11.2017
French boat smashes record to win Transat Jacques Vabre Class40 ahead of Anglo-Spanish duo
Maxime Sorel and Antoine Carpentier on V and B, have won the Class40 of the 13th edition of the Transat Jacques Vabre, after crossing the finish line in the Bay of All Saints in Salvador de Bahia on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 23:19:15 (UTC), 17 days 10 hours 44 minutes and 15 seconds after leaving Le Havre, Normandy France.

V and B covered the theoretical course of 4,350 nautical miles at an average speed of 10.40 knots but actually sailed 4,513 nautical miles at an average speed of 10.77 knots.

V and B beat the previous record of 22 days 13 hours 2 minutes 22 seconds set by the Italian duo Giovanni Soldini and Pietro D’Ali on Telecom Italia in 2007 (the first time Class40 had been included in the Transat Jacques Vabre and the last time the race went to Salvador) by 05 days 02 hours 18 minutes and 07 seconds.

In one of the closest finishes in Transat Jacques History, Aïna Enfance and Avenir (Aymeric Chappellier / Arthur Le Vaillant) finished second, just 17 and 42 seconds behind. Sorel, who finished second with Sam Manuard, the designer of his (and the second-placed) 40ft monohull in the last edition of this bi-annual double-handed Route du Café, in 2015, only finally moved into the lead in the later afternoon today (Wednesday).

And after over 4,500 miles of crossing the Atlantic, Phil Sharp (Britain) and Pablo Santurde (Spain) on Imerys Clean Energy are only 35 miles from the finish line.

Sharp and Santurde led the race for 12 days but in a boat that is a generation older than the two ahead was technologically outrun in the final straight in beam reaching conditionas along the coast of Brazil.

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Transat Jacques Vabre 22.11.2017

22.11.2017

French and Physics defy Anglo-Spanish duo
The closest finish in Transat Jacques Vabre Class40 history is still on the cards at around 23:00 tonight (Wednesday), but the Anglo-Spanish duo of Phil Sharp and Pablo Santurde (Imerys Clean Energy) will need to play a joker from up their sleeves if they are still to be at the table and upset their French rivals on the line.
Meanwhile, in Salvador de Bahia, the final three 60ft monohull Imoca boats crossed the line in the Bay of All Saints today in more relaxed fashion. Thirteen Imoca left Le Havre and thirteen made it to Salvador de Bahia.

Class40

ETA: The leaders, Wednesday at November 22, 23-24:00 UTC

Map and ranking

With 80 miles left to the finish in Salvador de Bahia, the three-horse race seemed to have narrowed to two as the latest generation French boats continued to pull away remorselessly from the Anglo-Spanish duo of Phil Sharp and Pablo Santurde (Imerys Clean Energy). But on the eighteenth day of the race, adrenaline is driving them all through the fatigue.

At 16:00 (UTC) V and B (Maxime Sorel / Antoine Carpentier) had edged past Aïna Enfance and Avenir (Aymeric Chappellier / Arthur Le Vaillant) into the lead, but only by 1.6 miles, with both making 9 knots in what has become a match race. Imerys Clean Energy was 33.7 miles behind.

“The end of the race is coming, the conditions for sailing are incredible, but unfortunately we’re not in the position we’d like,” Sharp said at lunchtime. “We lost the lead while reaching. There’s nothing we can do at this angle, these boats are faster, we did the best we could, but they’ve just been irresistible. But all is not lost, we made this small shift offshore, we had no hope staying on this line 15 miles behind. We know that at night there’s very little wind at the finish in Bahia, so you never know. We’ll give everything right up to the line.”

That is not just wishful thinking. Even the larger and faster multihulls and 60ft Imoca monohulls have parked up in the Bay of All Saints, so it could still favour a boat arriving later with momentum.

Imerys Clean Energy was first across the start line in Le Havre, has led the race for 12 and was first out of the Doldrums. It had a 20-mile cushion, a lot in the context of a race where one mile has sometimes separated these top three, but it proved not be a comfortable one.

The French 40ft monohulls are version 3s of the Manuard Mach 40 design and Sharp’s version 2 is simply slower in beam reaching wind angles.

“With nothing to lose, we decided to implement a different strategy – to sail further east offshore in the hope that we’d find a stronger breeze in the night,” Sharp said. Disappointingly, this prediction didn’t materialise and the Mach 3s inshore enjoyed the same breeze. I think it will take some unlikely calms or an angry fisherman with long floating nets to slow down the front runners now – having been victim of this myself in the past, anything is possible.”

Softening winds have already seen the two French boats head right into the coast in the search for any zephyr. Imerys Clean Energy, forced further offshore looking for different wind, has gybed back towards them. Aïna Enfance and Avenir reported tearing their spinnaker and getting their keel caught on a net overnight…there are still some pitfalls along the road.

Whatever the outcome, all three boats will smash, by over five days, the Transat Jacque Vabre record of 22 days 13 hours 2 minutes 22 seconds set by the Italian duo Giovanni Soldini and Pietro D’Ali on Telecom Italia in 2007 (the first time Class40 had been included in the Transat Jacques Vabre and the last time the race went to Salvador).

Imoca

Romain Attanasio and Aurélien Ducroz on Famille Mary – Étamine du Lys completed the set of 13 Imoca in Salvador de Bahia, crossing the line in the Bay of All Saints at 16:17:27 (UTC). Attanasio was reunited on the pontoon with his partner in life and on land, Britain’s Samantha Davies and their son Reuben. Davies had finished sixth on Monday evening with Tanguy de Lamotte on Initiatives Cœur.

Arrivals

Wednesday, November 22

Eleventh Arnaud Boissières and Manuel Cousin on La Mie Câline – Artipôle at 05:42:45 (UTC)

Race time: 16 days, 17 hours 07 minutes and 45 seconds

Twelfth Fabrice Amedeo and Giancarlo Pedote (Italy) on Newrest-Brioche Pasquier at 10:16:16 (UTC)

Race time: 16 days, 21 hours 41 minutes and 16 seconds

Thirteenth Romain Attanasio and Aurélien Ducroz on Famille Mary – Étamine du Lys at 16:17:27 (UTC)

Race time: 17 days, 03 hours 42 minutes and 27 seconds

Point café

Date : 22/11/17 – 16h06

Class40
1 – V and B
2 – Aïna Enfance & Avenir
3 – Imerys Clean Energy

Multi50
1 – Arkema
2 – FenêtréA – Mix Buffet
3 – Réauté Chocolat

Imoca
1 – St Michel – Virbac
2 – SMA
3 – „DES VOILES ET VOUS!“

Ultim
1 – Sodebo Ultim‘
2 – Maxi Edmond de Rothschild

PRESS CONTACTS
Soazig Guého
+55 21 99 03 18 124
+33(0)6 62 08 75 44

Les mots des partenaires
Phil Sharp, skipper, Imerys Clean Energy (Class40)

“V and B and Aina are an evolution to the Mach 2 boat that we’re on, they’re generation 3 boats – it’s beamier and much more powerful in the hull. It’s much more suited to beam reaching conditions in strong winds, which are unfortunately the conditions we’ve had all the way since the Doldrums. We fulfilled our objective of being in the lead at the exit of the Doldrums, we had a 20-mile lead, but it wasn’t enough of a cushion to fend off the Mach 3’s when they were in their prime condition. There wasn’t a lot we could really do except helplessly watch them pass us. Now, we’re 20 miles behind, so it’s looking like a difficult shout to catch them before the finish but we’ve been doing everything we can to make up the gap. Are feeling is that we have nothing to lose and we have to enjoy the end of the race, keep the boat at its maximum and just be grateful for what an amazing opportunity we’ve had in this race. We’re both looking forward to the finish, it’s been a long race, two and a half weeks has gone pretty quickly, but this has been our home long enough and we’re looking forward to getting back to land and celebrating the performance we put in. We’ve worked really hard for this race and pushed ourselves right to the limit of mental and physical fatigue. We’re pleased with what we’ve done and it will nice to have a few caipirinhas with friends and family waiting at the finish to celebrate that.”
Maxime Sorel, skipper, V and B (Class 40)

“The longest day…Hello earth, this is our last message to you, we have less than 200 miles left to go and it’s going to be smoking hot finish; we’re not sure on how this story ends.”

Fabrice Amedeo, skipper, Newrest-Brioche Pasquier (Imoca)

“This crossing has been a mixture of joy and frustration, but that frustration will turn into positive energy for the future.”
Arnaud Boissières, skipper, La Mie Câline – Artipôle (Imoca)

“The crossing? We started in the cold with waves and finished in the warm without wind. It’s not been unpleasant, but it was a little longer than expected.“

Les mots des skippers
Live vacation with Phil Sharp at 12pm (Imerys Clean Energy)

Download
First reaction of Sam Davies after his arrival in Bahia

 

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Transat Jacques Vabre 21.11.2017

21.11.2017
Video Alert: Initiatives-Coeur finishes 6th in the IMOCA class of the Transat Jacques Vabre

After 15 days of racing, Initiatives-Coeur crossed the finish line of the 13th Transat Jacques Vabre on Monday, November 20th at 21h 15min 39s (French time). Tanguy de Lamotte (FRA) and Sam Davies (GBR) finish this theoretical course of 4,350 miles (8,056 km) between the French port of Le Havre and Salvador in Brazil in 6th place on the IMOCA, after trying, in vain, to catch up with the Kito de Pavant / Yannick Bestaven tandem who, ironically, sailed aboard the former Initiatives-Cœur.

VIDEO – Tanguy de Lamotte and Sam Davies on Initiatives-Coeur
arriving in Salvador, Brazil.
Click HERE to download video
© Nicolas Fabbri / Initiatives-Coeur

VIDEO – Boat arrival and interview with Sam Davies (GBR) –
interview starts at 02:24
Click HERE to download
© Transat Jacques Vabre / Sea Events

PHOTO – Tanguy de Lamotte and Sam Davies on the Initiatives-Coeur in Salvador, Brazil.
(More photos available to download HERE)
© Jean-Marie Liot / ALeA / TJV2017

——————————————————————————–

During this transatlantic race Sam and Tanguy had to get to know and master a new boat and learn to exploit the extra power gained by the foils. As the weather conditions have not always allowed it, the mixed duo sees there is a “job list” with areas for improvement to the monohull, that will go into the boatyard this winter. By completing the course with a boat in perfect condition, they have accumulated valuable information on how the boat’s handling. It is time for the debrief.

“A disadvantageous choice of sail”

Before the start, Sam and Tanguy chose to unload their spinnaker, a strategic decision that did not prove wise. “This sail choice is certainly our biggest mistake” – Sam.
“Our friends in front sailed superbly, the first three know their boat perfectly having sailed a Vendée Globe with it, they are at the end of a cycle, while we are starting ours. As for Bastide Otio, it is a very good boat, I know what I am talking about (laughs), Yannick and Kito have sailed particularly well after having managed to take the lead from us in the Doldrums, I am happy for Kito.” – Tanguy.

“Sam and I did not see much of each other!”

With the Transat Jacques Vabre now completed, Tanguy is about to turn a page in his life of offshore racing. “It was a wonderful transition transat, I am very happy and proud of the way the project is communicated, it is simple and natural. In 15 days, Sam has learned a great deal from this new boat, she felt good and confident even in difficult conditions such as the front we had at the start. At that moment, we were more in relay mode. Nevertheless, the atmosphere was good, we made our decisions together and it was a very fine last race.” – Tanguy.

“If the children were not waiting for us on arrival, we would turn around to stay at sea!”

Whether through the radio interviews or videos, their happiness to be at sea was obvious. Sam was “So happy to helm this boat, I do not want to leave it! I am confident for the upcoming solo challenges, I look forward to making progress with this boat. If the children were not waiting for us on arrival, clearly, we would turn around! (laughs)”
More moderate, Tanguy is happy to touch down. “12 years ago I was finishing my Mini Transat in Salvador de Bahia, I am really happy to go back and be able to spend a few days on holiday with my family.”

“The solidarity objective has been beyond our expectations”

Each race is the occasion of a large-scale awareness campaign during which the two main sponsors of the boat, K-LINE and Initiatives, via their donations to the Mécénat Chirurgie Cardiaque association, fund the surgical operations of children suffering from serious heart defects. 
Since the opening of the start village in Le Havre, Internet users have participated in a real challenge 2.0 consisting of gathering a maximum of “Likes” and “Shares” on the Initiatives-Coeur Facebook page. 
“It is astounding. The mobilisation around this project is incredible and heart-warming. The objective of this transatlantic race was to be able to finance 15 operations, but today the public interest is such that this figure exceeded our hopes.” – Tanguy.
In fact, 25 children will be saved, including 6 thanks to the engagement of VINCI Energies employees.

PHOTO – Initiatives-Coeur, the 6th IMOCA to arrive in Salvador, Brazil.
(Downloadable image)
© Jean-Marie Liot / ALeA / TJV2017

The video of crossing the finish line and the first interviews are available on: https://tjv2017.seaevents.tv

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Transat Jacques Vabre 20.11.2017

20.11.2017
Initiatives Cœur finishes sixth in Transat Jacques Vabre Imoca class
Tanguy de Lamotte and Samantha Davies, on Initiatives Cœur, have finished sixth in the Imoca class of the 13th edition of the Transat Jacques Vabre after crossing the finish line in the Bay of All Saints in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil on Monday, November 20, 2017 at 20:15:39 (UTC), 15 days, 07 hours 40 minutes and 39 seconds after leaving Le Havre, Normandy, France.

Initiatives Cœur covered the theoretical course of 4,350 nautical miles at an average speed of 11.85 knots but actually sailed 4,744 nautical miles at an average speed of 12.90 knots. It finished 02 days 00 hours 03 minutes and 53 seconds behind the winner, St Michel-Virbac.

De Lamotte and Davies, the popular duo, who finished fifth in 2015, and were both making their fifth participation in this bi-annual, double-handed Route du Café, fought back hard in this competitive fleet. They prospered, relative to their other captives in the Doldrums, as their easterly strategy paid out and they gained two places.

Davies, who grew up sailing on the Solent and has an engineering degree from Cambridge University, will now inherit from the De Lamotte, the Initiatives Cœur campaign and the powerful 60ft monohull for the 2020 Vendée Globe. The successful campaign supports the Mécénat Chirurgie Cardiaque charity, which enables children around the world to undergo cardiac surgery. The boat is a 2010-generation, but one that has been significantly upgraded with foils (it was Jérémie Beyou’s boat which finished 3rd in the last Vendée Globe).

After celebrating with de Lamotte, her partner on the water, Davies will be back on the pontoon to see in her partner in on land and life, Romain Attanasio on Famille Mary – Étamine Du Lys, who is due to finish on Wednesday, November 22.