Schlagwortarchiv für: Rolex Fastnet Race

Fastnet Startfeld

Rolex Fastnet Race 06.08.2017

06.08.2017

Startvideo

Classic upwind start for record breaking Rolex Fastnet Race

The Solent laid on ‚classic‘ conditions for the start of the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s 47th Rolex Fastnet Race. In brilliant sunshine and with brisk westerly winds gusting up to 20 knots, the giant fleet tacked up the western Solent before compressing through the usual bottleneck at Hurst Narrows. A record-sized fleet of 368 boats started the race, 12 more than two years ago, confirming the Rolex Fastnet Race’s position as the world’s largest offshore yacht race.

The first start got underway at 11:00 BST for the nine multihulls and within minutes, the blue three-hulled streak that is Concise 10 had pulled out a lead, frequently heeling to an alarming degree, just one hull immersed. By the time IRC One was starting at 12:20 Tony Lawson’s MOD 70, skippered by Ned Collier Wakefield, was already off Poole. Crewman Paul Larsen, who five years ago became the world’s fastest sailor setting a world record of 65.45 knots, reported Concise 10 was sailing under reefed mainsail and staysail. „We’re making 20 knots tacking past Poole and just dropping into the watch system. Glamour start conditions in the Solent. I can just see the next boats clearing Hurst Castle.“ However Larsen warned that unless the wind freed up, there was little chance for them to break the multihull race record. By 1500 Concise 10 was already level with Portland Bill.

The multihulls were followed away from Cowes by two other ’non-IRC‘ classes – the nine doublehanded IMOCA 60s and twenty seven Class40s. Given the upwind conditions, the older, conventionally foiled IMOCA 60s were prevailing. At 1630 Paul Meilhat and Jules Verne Trophy record holder crewman Gwénolé Gahinet aboard SMA, the 2012-3 Vendee Globe (and the 2013 Rolex Fastnet Race) winner as MACIF, were leading the 60s past Portland Bill. The first ‚foil-assisted‘ IMOCA 60 was favourite Alex Thomson and Nicholas O’Leary on Hugo Boss in third place, taking a northerly route, close to the land.

In the Class40s present championship leader Phil Sharp on board Imerys led past St Alban’s Head, but later there was little too choose with the British boat neck and neck for the lead in this incredible fleet with the Maxime Sorel-skippered V And B, Burkhard Keese’s Stella Nova, Benoit Charon’s LMAX Normandie and race veteran Halvard Mabire and Miranda Merron on Campagne de France.

The five IRC handicap classes, chasing the race’s overall prize of the Fastnet Challenge Cup started with the smallest boats first at 1120.

This afternoon at 1600, the IRC One fleet had fanned out across the course to the southeast of St Alban’s Head. James Neville’s HH42 Ino XXX was leading the charge inshore as Staffan Wincrantz’s Arcona 465 SALT 2.0 was ahead on the water to the south, just ahead of the venerable 1960s maxi Kialoa II, owned by Patrick Broughton.

Mid-afternoon, competitors in IRC Two were favouring the inshore route with Dutchman Frans Rodenburg’s First 40 Elke, closest to St Alban’s Head at 1620, with class favourite Gilles Fournier and Corinne Migraine’s J/133 Pintia nearby.

The IRC Three boats were following a similar tactic with the offshore tack being less popular. Having started 20 minutes earlier, they were still successfully fending off the advances of the larger, faster IRC Two fleet. The Russian JPK 10.80, Igor Rytov’s Boyatyr, was leading the pack inshore while the brilliantly-named Seafarers Ale Anticipation, the First 40.7 of former 470 Olympian Pete Newlands, was ahead on the water offshore.

The inshore-offshore spread was more evenly distributed among the smallest boats in IRC Four. Here Noel Racine’s impeccably sailed JPK 10.10 Foggy Dew was ahead inshore while Dan Rigden’s Elan 37 Tacktic was furthest down the track out to sea.

The last to start were the largest in the IRC fleet, IRC Zero, including the line honours contenders George David’s Rambler 88 and Ludde Ingvall’s 100ft CQS. By 1520 Rambler 88 was off and close into St Alban’s Head, leading IRC Zero on the water just ahead of the biggest boat in the fleet, the 115ft Nikata.

 

Among the seven one design VO65s competing in ‚Leg 0‘ of the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race, it was very close, with the Charles Caudrelier-skippered Dongfeng Race Team a nose ahead and making 12.3 knots but facing a threat from Team Brunel, skippered again by Dutch race veteran Bouwe Bekking, making 12.5 as the boats passed St Alban’s Head.

 

This morning Xabi Fernández, skipper of MAPFRE, looked forward to the race: „Once out of the Solent it will be upwind sailing up to the Fastnet rock, and finally we will sail downwind towards Plymouth. This is the first time I’ve competed in the Rolex Fastnet Race. It is a historic race, much like the Rolex Sydney Hobart.“

 

Joan Vila, MAPFRE’s legendary navigator confirmed the forecast: „Once we leave the Solent, the wind will blow at around 20 knots. From there, it will drop until tomorrow morning, with the probability of encountering areas of very light wind. As we get closer to Plymouth, the wind will build again.“

HOW TO FOLLOW THE RACE

RACE MINISITE: www.rolexfastnetrace.com
Follow the story of the race with all the latest news and updates, great images from the start, Fastnet Rock and from the race course, plus video, audio, fleet tracking and the Virtual Regatta game.

SOCIAL MEDIA:
Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/royaloceanracingclub
Twitter: twitter.com/rorcracing or @rorcracing
Instagram: instagram.com/rorcracing or @rorcracing
YouTube – youtube.com/user/RORCRacing
The official Race Hashtag is #rolexfastnetrace

FASTNET RADIO & TV:
Set up to engage race fans with regular updates, Fastnet Radio will be broadcasting in Plymouth on 87.9FM.
https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com/Multimedia/87-9-fm-fastnet-radio-2017.html

RACE TRACKER:
Watch the Rolex Fastnet Race online via the fleet tracker. YB Trackers are fitted to every yacht so you can see each boat’s position along the course. View by class or select your favourites to follow friends and family, check out their boat speed and weather conditions in real time, read the social media feed and see how the live leaderboard is developing at https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com/Tracking/2017-fleet-tracking.html

VIRTUAL RACE: Nearly 10,000 people have signed up so far!
Armchair sailors will be able to test their skills on the same course as competitors in the 2017 Rolex Fastnet Race. Watch out, it’s addictive!
https://www.virtualregatta.com/en/index_fastnet2017.php

 

Fastnetrace 05.08.2017

Rolex Fastnet Race 05.08.2017

05.08.2017

2,700 Fastnet sailors face their personal Everest

The eve of the Rolex Fastnet Race is a nervous time for the 2,700 sailors about to embark on this 605-mile offshore classic. For the competitors gathered in Cowes on the Isle of Wight, a few are out to win one of the most coveted trophies in ocean racing, the Fastnet Challenge Cup. However for most of the crews on the 368 participating boats from 29 nations it will be sufficient to make it safely to the finish in Plymouth a few days from now.

Seventeen-year-old Montel Fagan-Jordan is about to compete in his first ever Fastnet just four years after taking up the sport. For a student from Greig City Academy, an inner-city state school from Hornsey in London, sailing does not usually feature on the radar of possible sporting pursuits. Montel is one of seven students from Greig City who have just taken their A Levels and are now about to undergo a much tougher exam out in the English Channel and the Celtic Sea. Montel has the added responsibility of being the crew captain and helmsman on board Scaramouche, a Frers 45 that once represented the USA in the 1983 Admiral’s Cup.

„Sailing is something different to what I’d normally do when you’re thinking about what sports you do in London, which is very landlocked,“ said Montel, who says his friends back at college don’t completely understand what he does on the water, or why. „Some are quite wary, some are quite supportive. But I love the different experiences you can get from going sailing.“

At the other end of the scale of experience and ambition are the professionally-crewed Grand Prix race boats including a healthy entry in the IMOCA 60 fleet. Vendée Globe and Volvo Ocean Race veteran Sam Davies sits in the driving seat of Tanguy de Lamotte’s foil-assisted design, Initiatives Coeur. Despite all her many thousands of ocean racing miles, Davies can remember the inspiration of the Fastnet Race when she was a young girl going sailing for the first time. „I was convinced I would never sail as far as the Fastnet Rock, so being here brings back memories of being a young kid thinking, ‚those people are so crazy doing that race but it’s so cool!‘ This time Davies‘ hope is to actually set eyes on the iconic Fastnet Rock and the welcome sight of that lighthouse that says it’s time to turn home for the finish in Plymouth. „The Fastnet Rock is beautiful if you can see it and it’s not raining,“ she said. „Fortunately the forecast looks like we’ll be going round during daylight hours this year.“

Among the favourites for crossing the finish line first are George David’s canting-keeled Rambler 88 from the USA and the Australian supermaxi CQS skippered by Ludde Ingvall. The Finnish round-the-world veteran skipper did the double in the 1995 Fastnet Race with Nicorette, taking both Line Honours, by a 24-hour margin, and also winning the Fastnet Challenge Trophy for best time under IRC. With this year’s forecast of westerly breezes suggesting it could be a long slog upwind all the way to the Fastnet Rock, the smart money is on 2017 being a good year for the big boats. Could Ingvall do the double again?

Ingvall is well versed in the quirks and unique challenges of the Rolex Fastnet Race, and says that his anchor was a key weapon in his 1995 victory. „When the tide was against us, we threw our anchor at the right time and we stopped for our lunch while our opposition disappeared backwards.“ CQS is a Swiss army penknife of high-tech ideas all merged into one boat, says Ingvall. „I’m getting on a bit, I’m in my sixties, so I thought I’d better hurry up and throw all my ideas into one boat and see how it works,“ he quipped. In addition to some cutting-edge technology, Ingvall is also racing alongside some top-notch sailing talent such as former America’s Cup skipper Chris Dickson.

Other previous winners include Géry Trentesaux, racing this year on Guyader Gastronomie – a TS42 multihull. Competing in his 14th race and the winner two years ago aboard his JPK 10.80, Courrier du Leon, this year will be special as it marks the 40th anniversary of Trentesaux’s first ever Fastnet race. It was another French crew that won the race prior to that in 2013, when Pascal & Alexis Loison made history by becoming the very first two handed entry to win the coveted Fastnet Challenge Cup. Perhaps because of their success, this year has seen a notable rise in two-handed entries. „There are few things so important or as fun for a father and son to do together as doing a race like this,“ said Pascal, a Cherbourg-based surgeon who taught Alexis to sail when he was very young.

Pascal summed up the unique appeal of the Fastnet: „The course is fantastic, marvellous. You have several headlands, and at each headland you have a new battle. Other offshore races are more direct, less complicated. They are not the same battle as you find on the Fastnet course.“

Commodore of RORC, Michael Boyd is taking part in his eighth Fastnet Race, sailing with Nick Jones aboard the First 44.7, Lisa. „Sailors are never happier than when they’re at sea and when they’re at sea for a good long time. They can leave behind all their concerns on the land, and when we’re out on the sea we’re in our natural environment, we’re all happy there. Also, this race is an amazing challenge on so many fronts. It’s an intellectual challenge, an emotional challenge, a physical challenge, a financial challenge and above all else it’s an organisational challenge.“

The CEO of RORC and accomplished professional racer Eddie Warden Owen will be watching the race unfold from ashore at race HQ. „I don’t think it’s hard to understand why this race is so popular. It’s the Everest of yachting. It’s on the bucket list, it’s a race that demands to be done. Yes, we talk a lot about the winners, but for most of the sailors it’s about getting to the Rock and back. Most of us live cosseted lives and the Rolex Fastnet Race is an opportunity for adventure.“

The first warning signal is at 10.50 BST on Sunday 6 August as the fleet sets out in separate divisions from the Royal Yacht Squadron start line in Cowes.

ENDS/…. Andy Rice

HOW TO FOLLOW THE RACE

 

The 47th edition of the Rolex Fastnet Race starts on Sunday 6 August. A record fleet of around 375 boats representing 29 different countries will take the start from the Royal Yacht Squadron line in the race organised by the Royal Ocean Racing Club. Follow all the action and don’t miss out on updates throughout the race. Here’s a quick guide.

RACE MINISITE: www.rolexfastnetrace.com

The easiest way to follow the fleet is via the RORC’s minisite. Follow the story of the race with all the latest news and updates, great images from the start, Fastnet Rock and from the race course, plus video, audio, fleet tracking and the Virtual Regatta game.

SOCIAL MEDIA:
Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/royaloceanracingclub
Twitter: twitter.com/rorcracing or @rorcracing
Instagram: instagram.com/rorcracing or @rorcracing
YouTube – youtube.com/user/RORCRacing
The official Race Hashtag is #rolexfastnetrace

FASTNET RADIO & TV:
Set up to engage race fans with regular updates, Fastnet Radio will be broadcasting on the Cowes Radio frequency 87.7FM on start day, Sunday 6th August and simulcast with Fastnet Radio station operation in Plymouth on 87.9FM.
https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com/Multimedia/87-9-fm-fastnet-radio-2017.html

LIVE STREAMING OF THE START SEQUENCE:

All the coverage will be available for download replays, as well as a podcast of the skippers briefing (Sat 5th August). Fastnet Radio is streamed on www.fastnetradio.uk, www.879fm.uk
and also on https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com

Fastnet TV will match the radio commentary from Fastnet Radio and will cover the entire start sequence live (1100 first start).

It will be streamed online from the official websites:

https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com
www.879fm.uk

RORC Facebook LIVE:
https://www.facebook.com/RoyalOceanRacingClub

RACE TRACKER:
Watch the Rolex Fastnet Race online via the fleet tracker. YB Trackers are fitted to every yacht so you can see each boat’s position along the course. View by class or select your favourites to follow friends and family, check out their boat speed and weather conditions in real time, read the social media feed and see how the live leaderboard is developing at https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com/Tracking/2017-fleet-tracking.html

TIMINGS FOR STARTS:
The race starts from one of yachting’s most famous locations, the Royal Yacht Squadron in Cowes on the Isle of Wight on Sunday 6th August 2017.

The start sequence begins with the first warning signal at 10.50 BST for the 47th edition. There will be live coverage of the starts. See above.

START TIMES:
1100 Multihull
1110 IMOCA 60, Class40
1120 IRC 4
1140 IRC 3
1200 IRC 2
1220 IRC 1
1240 IRC Zero & VO65

WHERE TO WATCH: COWES START:
The best vantage points of the start will be along Cowes Green and Egypt Esplanade on the Isle of Wight. Spectators will also be able to listen to the live commentary on the speakers along Cowes Parade and The Green from Fastnet Radio. As the fleet funnels out of the Solent there will be a good chance to see the yachts from Yarmouth on the Isle of Wight, and Hurst Castle on the mainland. Further along the coast Anvil Point, St Alban’s Head, and Portland Bill should also give a good view of the race on its outbound leg.

VIRTUAL RACE: Nearly 10,000 people have signed up so far!
Armchair sailors will be able to test their skills on the same course as competitors in the 2017 Rolex Fastnet Race. Watch out, it’s addictive!
https://www.virtualregatta.com/en/index_fastnet2017.php

Start Fastnetrace

Rolex Fastnet Race 04.08.2017

04.08.2017

How to follow the Rolex Fastnet Race
#rolexfastnetrace

Less than 48 hours to go!

The 47th edition of the Rolex Fastnet Race starts on Sunday 6 August. A record fleet of around 375 boats representing 29 different countries will take the start from the Royal Yacht Squadron line in the race organised by the Royal Ocean Racing Club. Follow all the action and don’t miss out on updates throughout the race. Here’s a quick guide.

RACE MINISITE: www.rolexfastnetrace.com

The easiest way to follow the fleet is via the RORC’s minisite. Follow the story of the race with all the latest news and updates, great images from the start, Fastnet Rock and from the race course, plus video, audio, fleet tracking and the Virtual Regatta game.

SOCIAL MEDIA:
Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/royaloceanracingclub
Twitter: twitter.com/rorcracing or @rorcracing
Instagram: instagram.com/rorcracing or @rorcracing
YouTube – youtube.com/user/RORCRacing
The official Race Hashtag is #rolexfastnetrace

FASTNET RADIO & TV:
Set up to engage race fans with regular updates, Fastnet Radio will be broadcasting on the Cowes Radio frequency 87.7FM on start day, Sunday 6th August and simulcast with Fastnet Radio station operation in Plymouth on 87.9FM.
https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com/Multimedia/87-9-fm-fastnet-radio-2017.html

 

LIVE STREAMING OF THE START SEQUENCE:

 

All the coverage will be available for download replays, as well as a podcast of the skippers briefing (Sat 5th August). Fastnet Radio is streamed on www.fastnetradio.uk, www.879fm.uk
and also on https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com

Fastnet TV will match the radio commentary from Fastnet Radio and will cover the entire start sequence live (1100 first start).

 

It will be streamed online from the official websites:

 

https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com
www.879fm.uk

 

RORC Facebook LIVE:
https://www.facebook.com/RoyalOceanRacingClub

 

RACE TRACKER:
Watch the Rolex Fastnet Race online via the fleet tracker. YB Trackers are fitted to every yacht so you can see each boat’s position along the course. View by class or select your favourites to follow friends and family, check out their boat speed and weather conditions in real time, read the social media feed and see how the live leaderboard is developing at https://www.rolexfastnetrace.com/Tracking/2017-fleet-tracking.html

TIMINGS FOR STARTS:
The race starts from one of yachting’s most famous locations, the Royal Yacht Squadron in Cowes on the Isle of Wight on Sunday 6th August 2017.

 

The start sequence begins with the first warning signal at 10.50 BST for the 47th edition. There will be live coverage of the starts. See above.

START TIMES:
1100 Multihull
1110 IMOCA 60, Class40
1120 IRC 4
1140 IRC 3
1200 IRC 2
1220 IRC 1
1240 IRC Zero & VO65

WHERE TO WATCH: COWES START:
The best vantage points of the start will be along Cowes Green and Egypt Esplanade on the Isle of Wight. Spectators will also be able to listen to the live commentary on the speakers along Cowes Parade and The Green from Fastnet Radio. As the fleet funnels out of the Solent there will be a good chance to see the yachts from Yarmouth on the Isle of Wight, and Hurst Castle on the mainland. Further along the coast Anvil Point, St Alban’s Head, and Portland Bill should also give a good view of the race on its outbound leg.

 

VIRTUAL RACE: Over 8,000 have signed up so far!
Armchair sailors will be able to test their skills on the same course as competitors in the 2017 Rolex Fastnet Race. Watch out, it’s addictive!
https://www.virtualregatta.com/en/index_fastnet2017.php

 

The Rolex Fastnet Race sets sail from Cowes on Sunday, 6th August with the first start at 1100 BST.

ENDS/…

Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race

Rolex Fastnet Race 04.08.2017

04.08.2017

Upwind slog forecast as Volvo Ocean Race fleet tackles Rolex Fastnet Race
The second stage of Leg Zero qualifying is the Rolex Fastnet Race, starting on Sunday, and it will present a very different challenge to the Volvo Ocean Race fleet

The second stage of Leg Zero qualifying is the Rolex Fastnet Race, starting on Sunday (6 August), and it will present a very different challenge to the Volvo Ocean Race fleet – as well as an early chance for the chasing pack to show they can match early pacesetters MAPFRE.

Xabi Fernández and his Spanish team found record-breaking form in winds of up to 35 knots to take the first of four Leg Zero races on Wednesday, a blast around the Isle of Wight in the Sevenstar Triple Crown series at Lendy Cowes Week.

While MAPFRE took the honours, the racing was incredibly close among the entire fleet and there were plenty of positives for all the skippers to take from the first battle of the Volvo Ocean 65s in the official build-up to the race itself, which starts 22 October from Alicante.

But while that first test came in true Volvo Ocean Race conditions – with the boats blazing through a tormented sea, records smashed and salty smiles all round – the famous Rolex Fastnet Race? Not so much!

This year’s 605 nautical mile Fastnet is going to be a long upwind slog all the way from the start line off Cowes, Isle of Wight, to the turn at the Fastnet Rock at the south east point of Ireland.

The last class to start at 1140 UTC, and one of the fastest, the Volvo Ocean Race fleet will quickly find themselves amongst the smaller boats ahead as the entire 390-boat fleet tacks up the western Solent in a classic Fastnet start.

The excitement could soon turn to frustration if the light conditions don’t allow the Volvo Ocean 65 fleet to make it past the first major headland, the Portland Bill, before the tide turns against them. With a strong eastwards rush of the tide against them by the coast, and lighter winds below them to the south, the boats that just blitzed the Isle of Wight record will be crawling.

“This race is fraught with hazards,” said Dee Caffari, skipper of Turn the Tide on Plastic. “Right from the start line as you leave off the Royal Yacht Squadron line through the Solent you’ve got shallows and tide to contend with and several tidal gates along the way which are either going to make or break your race… But it’s not my first Rolex Fastnet so I’m comfortable that I know where I’m going and what I’m doing.”

No respite awaits at Land’s End as they’ll pass through a cold front that will add rain to the insult of upwind sailing. A new high pressure will establish itself on Monday in the middle of the Atlantic that will feed the fleet steady northwesterly wind to cross the Celtic Sea. More upwind!

The stable conditions will allow the crews to soak up a beautiful rounding off the famous rock – which should make for some nice photos in the early hours of Tuesday, if the sun is up by then – before a nice run back to Plymouth in 15-20 knots.

For David Witt, skipper of Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag, it’s a good opportunity to test the wisdom of his decision to go with an all-male crew of seven instead of taking advantage of a rule that gives teams the option of adding up to two women to the team, or taking a fully mixed five male-five female crew.

Witt said: “We’ve got a bit of a strategy of having the least amount of people on board and the reason for that is for conditions like the Fastnet, especially coming back from the rock, when it’ll be VMG running 8-12 which is sort of what the majority of this Volvo is. We might tick a box and say we’re right, or we might say ‘hold on’ and change our whole strategy.”

The crews that are still new to their boats will be thankful for the opportunity to knock out some gybing practice before stages three and four of Leg Zero bring them into stronger downwind sailing again down the coast of Portugal.

Charles Caudrelier, Dongfeng Race Team, said: “It’s very good to be here because before the Volvo we couldn’t sail against the other ones, so we trained outside and we have no reference, only the numbers, so it’s good to race against the other ones and see how it goes and if we did a good job so it’s very important for everybody.”

For full crew lists for the Volvo Ocean Race teams in the Rolex Fastnet Race see volvooceanrace.com

Remaining Leg Zero races:

Stage 2, starting 6 August: Rolex Fastnet Race

Stage 3, starting 10 August: Plymouth to Saint-Malo

Stage 4, starting 13 August: Saint-Malo to Lisbon

2017-fastnetrace-012

Rolex Fastnet Race 03.08.2017

03.08.2017

Doublehanded demons

Thanks to our modern day lifestyles, a frequent problem facing race boats owners is finding willing and available crew. One solution is to sail with less people, an ultimate expression of this being two handed racing. Therefore it is no surprise that the IRC Two Handed class in this Sunday’s Rolex Fastnet Race has swelled, with 60 boats entered (plus nine IMOCA 60s). This was also helped by the outcome of the 2013 race, famously won for the first time ever by a two handed crew – Pascal and Alexis Loison on the JPK 10.10, Night and Day.

So far in the 2017 RORC Season’s Championship, leadership of IRC Two Handed has been a fight between two Jeanneau Sun Fast 3600s: Rob Craigie and Deb Fish on Bellino and Ian Hoddle and Ollie Wyatt on Game On. Bellino won the Cervantes Trophy, Myth of Malham and Morgan Cup; Game On the De Guingand Bowl and the Cowes Dinard St Malo Race. Also in the mix were Ed Fishwick and Figaro sailor Nick Cherry on their new 3600, Redshift Reloaded. However come the Channel Race, the first occasion the Loisins raced this year, they blitzed it, winning by an hour on corrected from Game On and Bellino.

Bellino’s Rob Craigie, who currently leads IRC Two Handed overall, has been racing shorthanded since the 1990, both doublehanded and solo – he was class winner and second home in the 2009 OSTAR transatlantic race from Plymouth to Newport. His co-skipper, Deb Fish was also a solo sailor who campaigned a Sun Fast 3200.

Craigie says that while solo offshore racing is a different sport, two handed is much closer to fully crewed. „If you are a skipper who just stands at the back and shouts, it will be a big change. If you are a skipper who gets involved, then less so. Manoeuvres take a bit longer as you’ve got to move the sail bags around and get them up and down.“

On board, ‚third‘ crewman is the autopilot, although Craigie admits that they use it less. „We are going back to hand steering because we find it faster although in the Fastnet you have to sleep more to be competitive.“ However it depends on the wind and sea state. „In waves the boat weaves a bit more than it would, even with an average helm.“

Dutch two handed offshore champions, Robin Verhoef and John van der Starre are entered on the J/122E Ajeto! The last three Rolex Fastnet Races they campaigned a J/111, finishing seventh in the 54 boat Two Handed class last time. They acquired their new boat this winter, which from the outset has been set up for shorthanding, with a heavier, deeper keel and less sail area. „To make it easier to sail shorthanded,“ explains van der Starre. „And we can adjust the mast while racing, which will be an advantage.“

So why do they race doublehanded. „Why? Because we are both a little bit crazy probably! Robin and I really like sailing shorthanded and it is always a hassle with a big team,“ van der Starre explains.

As to how they divide up the labour, generally if one is sleeping the other goes into solo mode, calling the other on deck for manoeuvres. When both are up they typically play to each other’s strengths: „Tactics is more my part,“ says van der Starre. „Robin is little stronger, so he does the heavy stuff, getting jibs up and down and gennakers, etc.“

On board they don’t run a watch system and do rely on the pilot. „The first 20 minutes you are better, but after that the pilot beats you,“ says van der Starre.

But the real grand masters of doublehanding are the IMOCA 60 sailors. And of them king is Jean-Pierre Dick, who has won two Barcelona World Races, two handed non-stop around the world and three Transat Jacques Vabres, two handed west across the Atlantic. Previous co-skippers included Damian Foxall, Loick Peyron and Jérémie Beyou. This time he is racing his foil-assisted Virbac-Paprec 3 with three time Solitaire du Figaro winner, Yann Eliès.

So what’s his secret? Dick agrees with van der Starre: „It is important to work and be effective as a couple rather than working just as two individuals. We try to be changeable as everyone has their own skills, so you try to take the experience of both people to get the best result. So this time, I have better knowledge of the boat while Yann is bringing his new view and has a lot more experience of the Channel from his Figaro racing. But we also need to enjoy it and not argue too much! Fortunately we are both ’senior‘ sailors now and we have similar thinking.“

As to their sleep – Dick says that they will have a rough watch system, while keeping it flexible, according to the conditions and the workload.

He is also looking forward to seeing how his VPLP-Verdier IMOCA 60 behaves now she is out of ‚Vendée mode‘, substantially lightened and with better optimised ballast and keel weight.

Click for the wind predictions for the Rolex Fastnet Race from Squid (HERE) and Mike Broughton (HERE)

The Rolex Fastnet Race from Cowes on Sunday, 6th August with the first start at 1100 BST.

How to follow the race:
All the latest news, race updates, video, photos, blogs from the boats + Live streaming of the starts: Race minisite:
https://fastnet.rorc.org/
Twitter: @RORCracing – Hashtag #rolexfastnetrace
Facebook: www.facebook.com/royaloceanracingclub
Instagram: instagram.com/rorcracing
Coverage on Fastnet TV & Radio: Cowes – 87.7fm, Plymouth – 87.9fm and online https://879fm.uk/
Virtual Regatta – https://www.virtualregatta.com/en/index_fastnet2017.php
Tracking: https://fastnet.rorc.org/
ENDS/…. James Boyd

 

Boris Herrmann beim Fastnetrace

Fastnet Race 02.08.2017

2. August 2017

Boris Herrmann/Pierre Casiraghi beim legendären Rolex Fastnet Race am Start

Boris Herrmann und Pierre Casiraghi starten am kommenden Sonntag (6. August) beim berühmt-berüchtigten Rolex Fastnet Race. Der Hamburger Segelprofi und sein Co-Skipper aus dem Fürstenhaus Monaco haben als Zweimann-Crew mit dem Open 60 „Malizia“ in der IMOCA-Klasse gemeldet. Die Langstrecke über 605 Seemeilen (1.120 Kilometer) führt von Cowes auf der Isle of Wight in Südengland um den Fastnet-Felsen südlich Irlands zurück nach Plymouth in der Grafschaft Devon. Der Klassiker mit oft extrem wechselhaften Bedingungen über zwei bis fünf Tage je nach Bootsgröße gilt physisch wie psychisch als große Herausforderung.

„Das Fastnet hat immer etwas Mystisches, weil die Regatta so unberechenbar ist“, beschreibt Boris Herrmann ein Rennen, das alle zwei Jahre nun schon zum 47. Mal ausgetragen wird. Für den geborenen Oldenburger ist es der Saisonhöhepunkt 2017. Traurige Berühmtheit erfuhr die Regatta 1979, als ein orkanartiger Sturm 19 Segler in den Tod riss. „Seitdem wurden die Sicherheitsauflagen sinnvoll verschärft“, beruhigt Herrmann die Fans, „wir gehen kein unkalkulierbares Risiko ein.“

Waren bei der Erstausgabe 1925 nur sieben Yachten dabei, von denen die Siegerin „Jolie Brise“ mehr als sechs Tage benötigte, könnten dieses Jahr 400 Meldungen aus 29 Nationen mit mehr als 4.000 Aktiven für einen neuen Teilnehmerrekord beim Rolex Fastnet Race sorgen. Darunter werden rund 20 deutsche Teams erwartet, darunter so bekannte Namen wie die „Varuna“, „Outsider“, „Haspa Hamburg“, „Walross IV“ und „Elan“.

Die größten wie die 35-Meter-Yacht „Nikata“ und schnellsten kämpfen um die Ehre, als First Ship Home Erster im Ziel zu sein und schielen dabei zudem auf den sechs Jahre alten Streckenrekord (ein Tag, 18 Stunden und 39 Minuten). Der Gesamtsieg entscheidet sich jedoch erst später, da nach berechneter Zeit (Handicap-Wertung) selbst die kleinsten Boote wie die 8,97 Meter kurze „Sibelius“ gewinnen können.

Die IMOCA-Klasse, deren Startschuss um 12.10 Uhr deutscher Zeit als zweiter nach den Mehrrumpfbooten fällt, ist mit neun Open 60 sehr stark besetzt. Alle werden zu zweit gesegelt und bilden eine eigene Wertungsgruppe. Mit ihrem Zieleinlauf auch des Duos Herrmann/Casiraghi wird im Laufe des Dienstags (8. August) oder bei sehr leichter Brise erst am Mittwochmorgen gerechnet.

Die Teams sind mit hochkarätigen Weltumseglern gespickt. Zu den Topfavoriten gehört der Brite Alex Thomson mit dem Iren Nicholas O’Leary auf der „Hugo Boss“. Bei Leichtwind ist auch mit der französischen „Sma“ von Marcus Hutchinson mit Gwenole Gahinet zu rechnen. Auf der „Generali“ von Alain Gautier (ebenfalls Frankreich) segelt die deutsche Isabelle Joschke.

Gut die Hälfte der Boote, darunter auch die „Malizia“ unter dem Stander des Yacht Club de Monaco (YCM), gehört zur neuen Generation, die mit Foils (Tragflächen) ausgestattet ist. Sie heben die 18,28 Meter langen Rümpfe bei mittleren bis starken räumlichen (von der Seite bis schräg von hinten) Winden ein Stück weit aus dem Wasser und ermöglichen Höchstgeschwindigkeiten, die sonst 30-Meter-Supermaxis vorbehalten sind.

„Natürlich träumen wir von solchen Idealbedingungen“, so der 36-jährige Herrmann, „aber die können wir uns ja nicht aussuchen. Im Moment sieht es eher nach einem Leichtwindszenario aus.“ Ausgeprägte Flauten haben so manche Mannschaft in der Vergangenheit sogar zum Ankern gezwungen, um nicht durch die Tidenströmung rückwärts getrieben zu werden.

Der Kurs führt zunächst durch den Solent an Hurst Castle vorbei hinaus in den Englischen Kanal um Land’s End, die Südwestecke Großbritanniens herum in die Irische See. Nach dem Wendepunkt Fastnet Rock, auf dem ein Leuchtturm steht, geht es außen um den Felsen Bishop Rock der Scilly-Inseln herum nach Plymouth. „Die Gezeiten, aber auch der Küstenverlauf machen das Fastnet taktisch extrem anspruchsvoll“, sagt der passionierte Hochseesegler Pierre Casiraghi.

Der 29-jährige Sohn von Prinzessin Carolin von Monaco und Vizepräsident des YCM steuert bis Sonnabend (5. August) noch in Palma de Mallorca bei der GC 32 Racing Tour den gleichnamigen Foiler-Katamaran „Malizia“. Zur Crew gehört auch Boris Herrmann. Den monegassischen Geschäftsmann und den viermaligen Weltumsegler verbindet eine langjährige Segelfreundschaft. Ziel des gemeinsamen IMOCA-Projekts ist die Vendée Globe, bei der Herrmann 2020 als erster Deutscher allein nonstop um die Welt segeln will.

Das Rolex Fastnet Race wird multimedial auf professionellem Niveau begleitet. Der Start wird per Livestream im Internet auf der Veranstalterwebsite unter rolexfastnetrace.com übertragen. Dort gibt es auch einen Tracker, der die Positionen der einzelnen Yachten über den gesamten Rennverlauf verzeichnet.

HINWEIS für die Redaktionen:

Die redaktionelle Verwendung der angehängten Fotos ist unter Nennung des Copyrights honorarfrei. Wenn für den Abdruck eine höhere Auflösung benötigt wird, lassen sie es uns bitte wissen.

Über den Rennverlauf halten verschiedene Kanäle des Veranstalters auf dem Laufenden, die alle auf der offiziellen Website unter rolexfastnetrace.com zu finden sind.

Nach der Regatta erhalten sie von uns einen Abschlussbericht mit Fotos vom Rennen, auch von Bord der „Malizia“.

Weitere Informationen und Fotos:

Andreas Kling

M: +49 (172) 257-8817

T: +49 (4822) 360-900

andreas@borisherrmannracing.com

borisherrmannracing.com

facebook.com/borisherrmannracing

twitter.com/borisherrmann

 

Fastnetrace-Sam Davies

Rolex Fastnetrace 26.07.2017

26.07.2017

Ocean racing’s big guns in the Rolex Fastnet Race

Among the 400 boat fleet setting off from the Solent on 6 August in the Rolex Fastnet Race will be three of offshore racing’s most prestigious classes.

Grabbing the headlines will be the one design VO65s as the Rolex Fastnet Race serves as Leg Zero of the Volvo Ocean Race and it will be the first occasion the teams will have lined up in anger. Among the seven, three teams competed in the 2014-15 Volvo Ocean Race: 2nd placed Team Brunel; the Chinese Dongfeng Race Team, third last time and the Spanish MAPFRE team, which finished fourth. In one designs, experience is everything so these teams will have the edge, but crew from other boats in the last race have been distributed across the new teams too.

Dongfeng Race Team benefitted from being first to get sailing this time, picked their boat up post-refit late January. They have several of the same crew and have focussed more on the competition this time, says skipper Charles Caudrelier. „Last time we spent the first five months in China doing crew selection. We put 30% of our time into performance. This time we put in 70%.“

This year’s Rolex Fastnet Race will be Caudrelier’s third. In 2011, on the VO70 Groupama, they finished just behind Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing, whose time of 32 hours and 39 minutes remains the monohull record. „I like the race because it is interesting – short and complicated with lots of transitions,“ says Caudrelier.

While Dongfeng is a favourite, late to the party is Turn the Tide on Plastic, skippered by Dee Caffari, their campaign was only announced mid-June.

Caffari is a big fan of the Rolex Fastnet having completed her first on a Challenge boat in 2001. She was on Team SCA two years ago: „It is an ocean classic everyone wants to do. It covers such a range of boats and sailors, it is like an oceanic version of Round the Island Race.“

Former Team SCA skipper Sam Davies has returned to the IMOCA 60 class. She has taken over the Initiatives Coeur campaign from Tanguy de Lamotte but the two are sailing together for the rest of 2017.

„Everyone is happy Sam’s in the driving seat. It is a great continuation for the project,“ says de Lamotte. Davies, who also raced with de Lamotte in 2015, said: „I am very excited Tanguy gave me this opportunity. It is a project that I know every well – a cool boat, a cool team and cool charity project to be involved.“ It supports Mécénat Chirurgie Cardiaque, which funds operations on children born with heart defects. They are sailing the foil-assisted IMOCA 60 that finished the last Vendée Globe in third.

As with the other eight IMOCA 60s competing, they are racing the Rolex Fastnet Race doublehanded. Before sailing the race together in 2015, de Lamotte won it twice in the Class40, while Davies‘ first race was in 1995 on a Sun Legend 41 and she has done it countless times since.

They are up against the boats which finished first and second in the Vendée Globe: Bureau Vallée 2 (ex-Banque Populaire) campaigned by Louis Burton and Servane Escoffier, and Alex Thomson and Irish sailor Nicholas O’Leary on Hugo Boss.

For Thomson, the Rolex Fastnet Race has played a huge part in his sailing career. „My first was in 1995 on a Sigma 36 called British Eagle – it took just over seven days – but in that race I found my love for offshore racing. That’s the great thing about the Fastnet – it introduces people to proper offshore racing.“ The 2003 race was the first occasion Thomson sailed under the colours of Hugo Boss, preluding a 14 year sponsorship deal.

This time, Thomson who is sailing with Nicholas O’Leary is hoping to beat the other IMOCA 60s but is bullish about taking on the larger boats in his foil-assisted weapon. „Downwind we’re quicker than a VO65 and if you give us the right conditions (22-25 knots, broad reaching) we can beat Rambler, but in the Fastnet you don’t get to choose the weather you sail in.“

Most significant in the Rolex Fastnet Race’s non-IRC line-up is the 34 boat Class40 fleet. In this are a mix of pro sailors and enthusiastic amateurs and boats ranging from state of the art reaching machines to old production boats. It is also one of the most international line-ups including Russia and Japan, Sweden, Norway, Austria, the Netherlands, South Africa and Oman.

The Rolex Fastnet Race will be the first event for the newest, most radical Class40. Louis Duc’s Carac (150) is a Marc Lombard design and has the highest volume bow permitted under the Class40 rule. The latest models from all the leading Class40 designers are competing such as Brieuc Maisonneuve’s Cap Des Palmes, a Guillaume Verdier Tizh 40; Norwegian Henrik Bergesen’s Hydra, a brand new Owen Clarke design; two new Sam Manuard-designed Mach 40 Mk3s, Maxime Sorel’s V And B and Catherine Pourre’s Eärendil.

President of the Class40, Halvard Mabire, is racing Campagne de France, a new boat to his own design, with his English partner Miranda Merron. Mabire’s first Fastnet was in 1977. „It was on a small plywood boat with hard chines. It was one of the slowest Fastnets in history – very very light all the way. I did it again in 1979, which was not the same story.“ He has since done the race as part of the Admiral’s Cup and on a Maxi One Design. „The Fastnet is one of the oldest races. It is very nice to have this race – we know it will happen every two years. It is good that the RORC opened it to multihulls, IMOCA 60s and Class40s.“

As to the form, the favourite is, for once, not French, but from the Channel Islands. Following his 2006 Route du Rhum victory, Phil Sharp has returned to the Class 40. His yacht Imerys currently leads the 2017 Class40 championship, following their second place in the recent Les Sables-Horta-Les Sables race.

The Rolex Fastnet Race starts from off Cowes at 1100 on 6 August.

How to follow:
All the latest news, race updates, video, photos, blogs from the boats + Live streaming of the starts: Race minisite: https://fastnet.rorc.org/
Twitter: #rolexfastnetrace @RORCracing
Facebook: www.facebook.com/royaloceanracingclub
Instagram: instagram.com/rorcracing
Coverage on Fastnet TV & Radio: Cowes – 87.7fm, Plymouth – 87.9fm and online https://879fm.uk/
Virtual Regatta – check the race minisite closer to the start to sign up for the game
ENDS/…. James Boyd
NOTES TO EDITORS

Press Enquiries:
Trish Jenkins
RORC Press Officer – Rolex Fastnet Race
M: +44 (0)7880 518689
E: press@rorc.org
Skype: trish jenkins

RORC Race Enquiries:
Nick Elliott, Racing Manager
Royal Ocean Racing Club
T: +44 (0) 1983 295144
E: racing@rorc.org
W: https://www.rorc.org/

Royal Ocean Racing Club:
20 St James’s Place
London SW1A 1NN
Tel: 020 7493 2248
Fax: 020 7493 2470
E: info@rorc.org

Royal Ocean Racing Club:
Established in 1925, The Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC) became famous for the biennial Fastnet Race and the international team event, the Admiral’s Cup. It organises an annual series of domestic offshore races from its base in Cowes as well as inshore regattas including the RORC Easter Challenge and IRC National Championship in the Solent
The RORC works with other yacht clubs to promote their offshore races and provides marketing and organisational support. The RORC Caribbean 600, based in Antigua and the first offshore race in the Caribbean, has been an instant success. The 10th edition will take place in 2018. The RORC extended its organisational expertise by creating the RORC Transatlantic Race from Lanzarote to Grenada, the first of which was in November 2014. This year, the RORC Transatlantic Race will finish at Virgin Gorda, BVI as part of the Atlantic Anniversary Regatta

The club is based in St James‘ Place, London, but after a merger with The Royal Corinthian Yacht Club in Cowes, now boasts a superb clubhouse facility at the entrance to Cowes Harbour and a membership of over 4000

RORC website: www.rorc.org
Race minisite: https://www.fastnet.rorc.org
Twitter: #rorcrfr @RORCracing
Facebook: www.facebook.com/royaloceanracingclub
Instagram: instagram.com/rorcracing
RORC Rating:
The RORC has also been a leader in yacht handicap systems and in co-operation with the French offshore racing club, UNCL, created IRC – the principal yacht measurement system for the rating of racing yachts worldwide
The Spinlock IRC rating rule is administered jointly by the RORC Rating Office in Lymington, UK and UNCL Centre de Calcul in Paris, France
The RORC Rating Office is the technical hub of the Royal Ocean Racing Club and recognised globally as a centre of excellence for measurement. For Spinlock IRC rating information in the UK please see: www.rorcrating.com and for IRC rating globally www.ircrating.org
Social media: www.facebook.com/rorcratingwww.facebook.com/ircrating
Twitter @RORCrating @IRCrating
The Rolex Fastnet Race:

The 605nm Rolex Fastnet Race is organised by the Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC) and just 7 boats sailed in the first race in 1925. The race has been sponsored since 2001 by Rolex SA of Geneva and is legendary within the world of ocean racing. The 47th edition of the biennial race will start off the Royal Yacht Squadron line, Cowes, Isle of Wight on Sunday 6th August 2017. It is the largest offshore race in the world and attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts.